Staff View
Predicting exercise in persons with psychiatric disabilities

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Predicting exercise in persons with psychiatric disabilities
SubTitle
a cross-sectional study of social cognitive theory correlates
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zechner
NamePart (type = given)
Michelle Robinson
DisplayForm
Michelle Robinson Zechner
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gill
NamePart (type = given)
Kenneth
DisplayForm
Kenneth Gill
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Spagnolo
NamePart (type = given)
Amy
DisplayForm
Amy Spagnolo
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Goldberg
NamePart (type = given)
Richard
DisplayForm
Richard Goldberg
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Health Related Professions
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
People with psychiatric disabilities such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression are at risk for premature mortality and morbidity related to chronic health conditions. Physical activity improves health and quality of life, and shows promise for supporting mental health recovery. Physical activity is a complex behavior with many correlates. To date, no unifying theoretical model has fully explored the motivational constructs of physical activity in persons with psychiatric disabilities. Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) includes multiple correlates and predicts physical activity in many populations, including those with chronic health conditions. A proposed SCT model was tested to predict self-report exercise in persons with psychiatric disabilities. Recruitment of 120 persons from community mental health centers and supported housing programs in New Jersey completed nine self-report measures related to SCT variables, health, psychiatric distress and demographics in a cross-sectional design. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to test the hypothesis that the model would predict physical activity. Correlation and linear regression was used to test the secondary hypotheses regarding the relationships within the model. The proposed social cognitive model variables of social support, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, barriers and goal-setting practices in conjunction with the correlates of gender, age, number of health conditions and distress from psychiatric symptoms predicted 25% of the variance in self-report exercise. The model was significant overall, however SCT correlates did not show a significant prediction of exercise after controlling for gender, age, number of health conditions and distress from psychiatric symptoms. As predicted, amount of physical activity is related to the SCT correlates, except number of barriers. Depressive symptoms and female gender were both significant predictors of reduced physical activity, and less motivation for exercise. Self-efficacy for exercise was confirmed to have strong relationships with outcome expectations and goal-setting practices, with moderate relationships to barriers and social support. Exercise interventions based upon SCT should address gender and psychiatric symptom differences for best outcomes. Focused interventions providing goal-setting and goal-tracking skills may improve self-efficacy, and in turn increase the amount of weekly exercise. Additionally, mental health providers must consider type of social support necessary to encourage increased physical activity.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychiatric Rehabilitation
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Mental health
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Exercise therapy
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Mental illness
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Social cognitive theory
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Health Professions ETD Collection
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10007400001
Identifier
ETD_6408
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3416ZXN
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (106 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Michelle Robinson Zechner
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Zechner
GivenName
Michelle
MiddleName
Robinson
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-04-15 13:36:02
AssociatedEntity
Name
Michelle Zechner
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Health Related Professions
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
Back to the top
Version 8.4.8
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2022