Staff View
Salinity effects on germination in perennial ryegrass

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Salinity effects on germination in perennial ryegrass
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Koch
NamePart (type = given)
Eric D.
NamePart (type = date)
1988-
DisplayForm
Eric D. Koch
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bonos
NamePart (type = given)
Stacy A
DisplayForm
Stacy A Bonos
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Meyer
NamePart (type = given)
William A
DisplayForm
William A Meyer
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Huang
NamePart (type = given)
Bingru
DisplayForm
Bingru Huang
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hurley
NamePart (type = given)
Richard
DisplayForm
Richard Hurley
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
As potable water restrictions continue to tighten and there is an increase in effluent water use, it is necessary to identify turfgrasses with improved salinity tolerance. High salinity levels can cause injury to turfgrass plants resulting in poor or unusable turfgrass sites. As more turfgrass sites become salt affected, there is a need for the development of salt tolerant turfgrass. Because salinity tolerance is a complex quantitative trait, the development of salt tolerant cultivars has been slow. Additionally, most screenings for salinity tolerant germplasm is conducted on mature plants. It has been observed that a different set of genes control salt tolerance of germinating seedlings when compared to mature plant tolerance. Past screening procedures for germination under saline conditions have been conducted in vitro on blotter paper, agar, and in hydroponic solutions. The goals of the first two chapters of this thesis were to develop novel screening techniques that would mimic realistic soil properties for germinating perennial ryegrass seeds. To achieve these goals, a greenhouse and a growth chamber experiment were conducted using native soil and topdressing sand respectively. A diverse range of perennial ryegrass cultivars were used and numerous measurements were utilized to quantify salinity stress during germination. Significant differences were observed based on the salinity level and cultivar used. Overall, salinity delayed germination of the perennial ryegrass seeds as salinity levels increased. Interestingly, there was no cultivar x treatment interaction indicating that cultivars that performed well under saline conditions, also performed well in the untreated control. Additional salinity research was conducted on perennial ryegrass to further understand the endophytic fungi that lives between the plant cells. The Neotyphodium endophyte in perennial ryegrass has been shown to convey resistance to various abiotic and biotic stresses but the study of salinity-endophyte interactions has been lacking in turfgrass. To further understand this interaction, a study was developed using perennial ryegrass clones both containing and not containing the endophytic fungi. The objective of this chapter of the thesis was to determine whether salinity tolerance is genotype-endophyte specific, or whether there is an overall endophyte effect on salinity tolerance in perennial ryegrass. Data obtained from this study showed a specific endophyte-host interaction where some plant genotypes perform better with the endophyte while other genotypes perform worse. Due to the complexity of salinity tolerance, evaluating aspects of this trait during plant growth and germination has been difficult.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Plant Biology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Ryegrasses
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Crops--Effect of salts on
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Salinity
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Germination
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6220
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xii, 146 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Eric D. Koch
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3668G2R
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Koch
GivenName
Eric
MiddleName
D.
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-03-24 16:20:13
AssociatedEntity
Name
Eric Koch
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
Back to the top
Version 8.4.8
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2022