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Development of new methods for analyzing lipid oxidation

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TitleInfo
Title
Development of new methods for analyzing lipid oxidation
SubTitle
accelerated solvent extraction and HPLC-DNPH analyses of carbonyl oxidation products
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Yao
NamePart (type = given)
Linhong
NamePart (type = date)
1987-
DisplayForm
Linhong Yao
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Schaich
NamePart (type = given)
Karen M.
DisplayForm
Karen M. Schaich
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
HO
NamePart (type = given)
CHI-TANG
DisplayForm
CHI-TANG HO
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hartman
NamePart (type = given)
Thomas G.
DisplayForm
Thomas G. Hartman
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Johnston
NamePart (type = given)
David
DisplayForm
David Johnston
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The basic reactions of lipid oxidation were first reported more than 50 years ago, yet accurate and reproducible measurement of lipid oxidation remains a serious problem and challenge for both industry and academia. This research addresses two critical issues in lipid oxidation measurements: 1) lack of extraction methods that do not induce adventitious oxidation or change existing oxidation products; 2) lack of sensitive reproducible methods for quantitating and identifying secondary non-volatile oxidation products such as carbonyls, core aldehydes in particular. This research aims to develop two reliable, sensitive and accurate methods for oxidation analyses: 1) a pressurized solvent extraction method that is efficient in removing lipid yet does not add to or destroy lipid oxidation products, and 2) an improved HPLC-DNPH assay to quantitate and identify soluble carbonyl oxidation products in individual lipid fractions. Baked pet food biscuits and dry extruded pet food kibbles were chosen as samples to conduct lipid extraction in pressurized accelerated solvent extractor (ASE) by adjusting a variety of factors such as temperature, sample particle size, polarity of extraction solvent, extraction static time and numbers of extraction cycles to investigate the effect of extraction conditions on lipid oxidation. Results showed extraction with two 15-minute cycles of chloroform:methanol at 40 C gave lipid yields of 75-100%, depending on the kibble. Lipid oxidation was minimal when temperature was limited to 40 C. Factors such as particle size, solvents and extraction static time and cycles could be combined and tailored to optimize extraction efficiency. Compared to traditional extraction methods, pressurized solvent extraction of lipids was significantly more efficient and induced less oxidation. A reverse phase HPLC-DNPH (2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine) assay capable of quantitating and identifying carbonyls in all lipid classes was developed using an acetonitrile–isopropanol-water gradient and diode array detection at 360 nm. Optical response decreased with fatty acid chain length; quantitation was achieved using average slopes for three size ranges. The assay was specific for carbonyls and detected 6-50 g/L and accurately quantitated 20 g/L standard aldehydes. LC-MS/MS Q-TOF verified hydrazone structures. Monomer carbonyls and core aldehydes were distinguished and quantitated in oxidized Trilinolein, commercial oils, and lipid extracts.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Food Science
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Lipids--Oxidation
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Solvent extraction
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6394
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xviii, 162 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Linhong Yao
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T35D8TPQ
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Yao
GivenName
Linhong
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-04-15 00:57:59
AssociatedEntity
Name
LINHONG YAO
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2017-05-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 30th, 2017.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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