Staff View
From mandatory to voluntary

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
From mandatory to voluntary
SubTitle
a study of nonprofit information sharing in public-nonprofit collaboration
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Peng
NamePart (type = given)
Shuyang
DisplayForm
Shuyang Peng
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Van Ryzin
NamePart (type = given)
Gregg G.
DisplayForm
Gregg G. Van Ryzin
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Thompson
NamePart (type = given)
Frank J.
DisplayForm
Frank J. Thompson
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
McDougle
NamePart (type = given)
Lindsey M.
DisplayForm
Lindsey M. McDougle
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pandey
NamePart (type = given)
Sanjay K.
DisplayForm
Sanjay K. Pandey
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
In public-nonprofit collaboration, information sharing is an essential activity that can advance a common understanding, resolve conflict, and enhance the capacity of both parties. Although previous research has well documented how the wealth of knowledge that nonprofit organizations have can facilitate problem solving and policy making in government, few studies have examined the motivational factors driving such information/knowledge sharing by nonprofit organizations. Adopting a social psychology framework of cooperation theory, this dissertation attempts to address this gap in our understanding. The dissertation views information sharing by nonprofits as a cooperative behavior composed of two dimensions - required and voluntary information sharing. Employing a mixed methods design, this dissertation first explores the concept of voluntary information sharing using a qualitative study, and then quantitatively tests the effects of instrumental and social motivational factors on predicting both types of sharing. By conducting interviews with 22 executive directors of nonprofit organizations in the State of New Jersey, the qualitative findings suggest that nonprofits engage in a variety of voluntary information sharing in collaboration with government. Specifically, three themes of information emerge: information about the organization, knowledge about the client and the community, and other specific types of information. A close examination reveals such voluntary sharing comes from instrumental and social motivational perspective. Instrumental perspective explains that nonprofit organizations voluntarily share information in order to acquire funding, resource, publicity, and reputation. On the other hand, social motivational perspective suggests that nonprofits engage in voluntary information sharing because it is consistent with the organizations’ values, image, and identity. In quantitatively testing the effects of instrumental and social motivational factors on required and voluntary information sharing, this dissertation utilizes a data set from a national survey of 424 nonprofit organizations. The results of hierarchical regression analysis indicate instrumental factors, such as government funding and formal service contract, are two major factors predicting required information sharing by nonprofit organizations. However, social motivational factors in terms of affective commitment, goal congruence, and motive-based trust are most influential in shaping voluntary information sharing. Overall, the dissertation contributes to a better understanding of the motivational factors underlying nonprofit information sharing activities, which also offers broader implications for managing public-nonprofit collaboration.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Public Administration (SPAA)
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6511
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (x, 158 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Knowledge management
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Nonprofit organizations
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Shuyang Peng
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T361125R
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Peng
GivenName
Shuyang
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-05-02 01:35:26
AssociatedEntity
Name
Shuyang Peng
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
Back to the top
Version 8.5.3
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2024