Staff View
Explaining government performance on e-participation in New Jersey

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Explaining government performance on e-participation in New Jersey
SubTitle
government capacity and willingness
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zheng
NamePart (type = given)
Yueping
DisplayForm
Yueping Zheng
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Holzer
NamePart (type = given)
Marc
DisplayForm
Marc Holzer
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zhang
NamePart (type = given)
Yahong
DisplayForm
Yahong Zhang
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hall
NamePart (type = given)
Jeremy L
DisplayForm
Jeremy L Hall
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Schachter
NamePart (type = given)
Hindy L
DisplayForm
Hindy L Schachter
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The importance of citizen participation has been widely accepted. However, for several reasons, the participation level has been decreasing during the past decades. The limitation of traditional participation makes it difficult to save it from eroding. With the rapid development of information technologies and their wide usage in private sectors for interacting with customers, governments began to use ICT tools to provide convenient ways for citizens to participate, which resulted in the rise of e-participation. The rise of e-participation, however, cannot cover its problem of imbalance. Great differences exist in government performance in e-participation both at the municipal and national levels. Comprehensive and convenient ways have been provided by some governments to actively engage citizens, while others have not followed suit. The following research question focuses on why such differences exist. Researchers tried to explain the determinants of e-participation diffusion and explore the factors influencing e-participation adoption and usage. Roles of political culture and orientation, infrastructure, transparency, etc., have been examined and tested. Still, a research gap exists in that government capacity and willingness have been missed. Government capacity is the foundation for governments to perform well and achieve their goals. Without the necessary capacity to serve as a reasonable base, it’s difficult for governments to adopt e-participation initiatives. Government willingness is the “pushing factor” in e-participation usage. Whether governments have the willingness to adopt and develop e-participation initiatives determines to what extent governments would like to allocate their resources to e-participation. So, in this study, I would like to test the impact of government capacity and willingness on e-participation. With data from municipal managers/business administrators in New Jersey, this study found that government capacity and willingness have a significant impact on e-participation performance. Governments, which have a higher level of capacity (technical capacity, financial capacity, administrative capacity, and political capacity), are more likely to perform better in e-participation initiatives. Government willingness is also a determinant to e-participation development. For governments with more willingness to involve their citizens in the running and use of information technologies, they are more likely to have a higher level of e-participation among citizens. This study, to some extent, fills the research gap in e-participation and contributes to the e-participation literature. With the data from municipalities in New Jersey, this research confirms the impact of government capacity and willingness on e-participation performance at the municipal level. Four dimensions of government capacity and two aspects of government willingness could influence e-participation directly or indirectly. The positive relationships between government capacity and willingness have been examined as well. The model proposed in this study and the findings will help to increase understanding of the phenomenon of e-participation diffusion and the determinants of e-participation development at the municipal level in New Jersey.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Public Administration (SPAA)
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Internet in public administration--New Jersey
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Political participation--New Jersey
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6508
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 134 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Yueping Zheng
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3GB25XT
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Zheng
GivenName
Yueping
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-05-01 19:13:40
AssociatedEntity
Name
Yueping Zheng
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
Back to the top
Version 8.4.8
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2022