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The brain mechanisms underlying walking in complex situations in healthy older adults and persons with Parkinson's disease

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TitleInfo
Title
The brain mechanisms underlying walking in complex situations in healthy older adults and persons with Parkinson's disease
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Maidan
NamePart (type = given)
Inbal
NamePart (type = date)
1977-
DisplayForm
Inbal Maidan
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Deutsch
NamePart (type = given)
Judith
DisplayForm
Judith Deutsch
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Tunik
NamePart (type = given)
Eugene
DisplayForm
Eugene Tunik
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hausdorff
NamePart (type = given)
Jeffery M
DisplayForm
Jeffery M Hausdorff
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Health Related Professions
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Introduction: The ability to walk safely and independently is a fundamental component of daily living activities. Walking while dual tasking and obstacle negotiation are two tasks that have been used to investigate walking in complex situations. Deficits in cognitive domains and sensory-motor processes associated with aging and neurodegenration impair the ability to successfully assess the environment and react to it. These changes in the ability to walk are modulated via neural circuits. However, the actual neural circuits of the brain involved in the control of locomotion in different challenging situations are still poorly understood. Methods: Two groups of subjects; 20 healthy older adults (mean age 69.7±1.3 yrs, 50% females) and 47 persons with PD (mean age 71.7±1.1 yrs, 32% females) were studied. The protocol included real and imagined walking while negotiating obstacles and dual tasking. Walking conditions were performed while being monitored with fNIRS and imagined walking were assessed in the MR scanner. A repeated measures design (condition x group) was conducted with two levels; within group and between groups. Results: Significant differences in brain activation were observed in the fMRI and fNIRS. Between groups comparison showed that persons with PD had a significantly higher activation in frontal, parietal, occipital, and cerebellum regions during usual walking compared to healthy older adults (p<0.048). Comparison between the walking tasks within each group revealed (1) increased activation during walking while negotiating obstacles in both groups (p<0.023) and (2) increased activation during walking while dual tasking only in healthy older adults (p<0.035). Correlations between brain activation and performance in motor-cognitive tests were found in both groups however, healthy older adults presented inverse correlation and persons with PD positive correlation. Conclusions: These findings indicate that subjects with PD activate larger brain areas than healthy older adults even during usual walking. Perhaps, this increased activation is a compensatory strategy to enhance performance. The increased activation already during usual walking task may limit the ability to increase activation or recruit additional brain areas during the more complex walking tasks and may contribute to the high prevalence of falls and the dual tasking difficulty in persons with PD.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Health Sciences
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6634
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (204 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Parkinson's disease
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Older people--Diseases
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Inbal Maidan
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Health Related Professions ETD Collection
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10007400001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T30K2BHK
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Maidan
GivenName
Inbal
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-07-25 16:18:10
AssociatedEntity
Name
Inbal Maidan
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Health Related Professions
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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ETD
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windows xp
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