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Aquatic gap analysis: tool for watershed scale assessment of fluvial habitat and biodiversity

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo
Title
Aquatic gap analysis: tool for watershed scale assessment of fluvial habitat and biodiversity
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Meixler
NamePart (type = given)
Marcia S.
Affiliation
Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources, Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bain
NamePart (type = given)
Mark B.
Affiliation
Cornell University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Galbreath
NamePart (type = given)
Greg H.
Affiliation
Cornell University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-Department); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-School); (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (SEBS)
Genre (authority = RULIB-FS)
Conference Paper or Lecture
Genre (authority = NISO JAV)
Version of Record (VoR)
OriginInfo
DateIssued (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
1996
PhysicalDescription
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
Extent
6 p.
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Biodiversity
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Conservation of natural resources
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
National protected area systems--Gap analysis
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Geographic information systems
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Biotic indices
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Stream habitat
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Watersheds
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Water quality
Subject (authority = lcsh/lcnaf)
Geographic
Allegheny River (Pa. and N.Y.)
Abstract (type = abstract)
Methods for the conservation of stream habitat and biodiversity at the watershed scale have not been developed. Watersheds span large land areas, encompass a connected range of stream sizes, and integrate natural and altered properties of a drainage area. Methods are needed to identify the locations of high biodiversity in watersheds, compare aquatic biodiversity distributions among regions, and provide watershed-scale information useful for targeting conservation measures. The National Biological Service (USA) in cooperation with other Federal and State agencies developed geographic information system (GIS) methodology called Gap Analysis to identify the distribution of biodiversity over large spatial areas. To date, it has been used to address only terrestrial conservation needs. We are developing an aquatic version of the Gap Analysis in the Allegheny River drainage in western New York State to define the methodology and evaluate the feasibility of predicting biodiversity distribution at the watershed scale.

Our standardized stream reach accounting system is based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Reach File 3 System. Each stream reach is classified into one of 18 habitat types for fish faunal predictions and one of 8 habitat types for invertebrate faunal predictions. Habitat types were defined using the following sets of physicochemical attributes: stream size (headwaters, large streams/small rivers, large rivers), physical habitat (dominated by natural geomorphological processes, moderately altered, and dominated by human structures and controls), water quality (suitable for life support, biologically stressful), gradient (steep, low slope) and riparian forest cover (closed canopy over channel, open channel). Stream size was determined from drainage area using the GIS. Physical habitat, reach gradient, and riparian forest cover were classified from topographic and land use maps. Physicochemical data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency STORET database provides a means to classify water quality. Using our habitat typing system, we predict that the highest fish diversity will be found in medium size streams with natural fluvial channels and good water quality, whereas the most reduced fish faunas will be found in large rivers with highly modified channels and poor water quality. For invertebrates, we predict that the greatest diversity (in terms of ecological function groups) will be in small and medium size streams with primarily a closed canopy, steep gradient, and good water quality.

Our GIS modeling effort succeeded in predicting the expected distribution of fish and invertebrate diversity at the watershed scale. Adequate biological and physicochemical data appear available and compatible with watershed-scale GIS programs. We also have extensive biological survey data that provides an independent means to testing the validity of our biodiversity predictions.
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Citation
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf)
1996
AssociatedEntity
Role
Publisher
Name
International Association for Hydraulic Research
AssociatedObject
Type
Journal
Relationship
Has part
Name
Proceedings of the Ecohydraulics 2000 Sympoium
Detail
A665-A670
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Conference
Label
International Symposium on Hydraulics and Habitats
Place
Québec (Québec)
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf)
1996-06
AssociatedEntity
Role
Sponsor
Name
International Association for Hydraulic Research
Detail
2nd
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Meixler, Marcia S.
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30178300001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3NZ89K1
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
Journal Article
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Copyright for scholarly resources published in RUcore is retained by the copyright holder. By virtue of its appearance in this open access medium, you are free to use this resource, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings. Other uses, such as reproduction or republication, may require the permission of the copyright holder.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Multiple author license v. 1
Detail
I hereby grant to Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (Rutgers) the non-exclusive right to retain, reproduce, and distribute the deposited work (Work) in whole or in part, in and from its electronic format, without fee. This agreement does not represent a transfer of copyright to Rutgers.Rutgers may make and keep more than one copy of the Work for purposes of security, backup, preservation, and access and may migrate the Work to any medium or format for the purpose of preservation and access in the future. Rutgers will not make any alteration, other than as allowed by this agreement, to the Work.I represent and warrant to Rutgers that the Work is my original work. I also represent that the Work does not, to the best of my knowledge, infringe or violate any rights of others.I further represent and warrant that I have obtained all necessary rights to permit Rutgers to reproduce and distribute the Work and that any third-party owned content is clearly identified and acknowledged within the Work.By granting this license, I acknowledge that I have read and agreed to the terms of this agreement and all related RUcore and Rutgers policies.
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2016-08-24T11:07:03
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