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Lateral Fluid Percussion: Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo
Title
Lateral Fluid Percussion: Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-Department); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-School); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (RWJMS)
Genre (authority = RULIB-FS)
Article, Refereed
Genre (authority = NISO JAV)
Version of Record (VoR)
Note (type = peerReview)
Peer reviewed
OriginInfo
DateIssued (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
2011
Abstract (type = Abstract)
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) research has attained renewed momentum due to the increasing awareness of head injuries, which result in morbidity and mortality. Based on the nature of primary injury following TBI, complex and heterogeneous secondary consequences result, which are followed by regenerative processes 1,2. Primary injury can be induced by a direct contusion to the brain from skull fracture or from shearing and stretching of tissue causing displacement of brain due to movement 3,4. The resulting hematomas and lacerations cause a vascular response 3,5, and the morphological and functional damage of the white matter leads to diffuse axonal injury 6- 8. Additional secondary changes commonly seen in the brain are edema and increased intracranial pressure 9. Following TBI there are microscopic alterations in biochemical and physiological pathways involving the release of excitotoxic neurotransmitters, immune mediators and oxygen radicals 10-12, which ultimately result in long-term neurological disabilities 13,14. Thus choosing appropriate animal models of TBI that present similar cellular and molecular events in human and rodent TBI is critical for studying the mechanisms underlying injury and repair. Various experimental models of TBI have been developed to reproduce aspects of TBI observed in humans, among them three specific models are widely adapted for rodents: fluid percussion, cortical impact and weight drop/impact acceleration 1. The fluid percussion device produces an injury through a craniectomy by applying a brief fluid pressure pulse on to the intact dura. The pulse is created by a pendulum striking the piston of a reservoir of fluid. The percussion produces brief displacement and deformation of neural tissue 1,15. Conversely, cortical impact injury delivers mechanical energy to the intact dura via a rigid impactor under pneumatic pressure 16,17. The weight drop/impact model is characterized by the fall of a rod with a specific mass on the closed skull 18. Among the TBI models, LFP is the most established and commonly used model to evaluate mixed focal and diffuse brain injury 19. It is reproducible and is standardized to allow for the manipulation of injury parameters. LFP recapitulates injuries observed in humans, thus rendering it clinically relevant, and allows for exploration of novel therapeutics for clinical translation 20. We describe the detailed protocol to perform LFP procedure in mice. The injury inflicted is mild to moderate, with brain regions such as cortex, hippocampus and corpus callosum being most vulnerable. Hippocampal and motor learning tasks are explored following LFP.
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
PhysicalDescription
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application/pdf
Extent
7 p.
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Citation
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf)
2011
AssociatedObject
Name
Journal of Visualized Experiments
Type
Journal
Relationship
Has part
Detail
e3063-
Identifier (type = volume and issue)
54,
Reference (type = url)
https://dx.doi.org/10.3791/3063
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Grant award
AssociatedEntity
Role
Funder
Name
New Jersey Commission on Brain Injury Research
Name (authority = orcid); (authorityURI = http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/identifiers/orcid.html); (type = personal); (valueURI = http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5694-4946)
NamePart (type = family)
Alder
NamePart (type = given)
Janet
Affiliation
Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fujioka
NamePart (type = given)
Wendy
Affiliation
Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lifshitz
NamePart (type = given)
Jonathan
Affiliation
University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Crockett
NamePart (type = given)
David
Affiliation
Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Description
Crockett, David P.
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Thakker-Varia
NamePart (type = given)
Smita
Affiliation
Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Neurosciences
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Lateral fluid percussion
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Hippocampus (Brain)
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Traumatic brain injury
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Brain--Wounds and injuries
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Morris Water Maze
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Mouse model of moderate injury
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Thakker-Varia, Smita
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30188900001
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Crockett, David
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30187000001
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Alder, Janet
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30160300001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3VX0JHH
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Copyright protected
Availability
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Open
Reason
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AssociatedObject
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License
Name
Multiple author license v. 1
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ContentModel
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RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL2)
ContentModel
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