Staff View
Flexible, implantable, micro-electrode probes with an ultrafast degrading polymer coating as a temporary insertion aid for long term neuronal signal aquisition

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Flexible, implantable, micro-electrode probes with an ultrafast degrading polymer coating as a temporary insertion aid for long term neuronal signal aquisition
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lo
NamePart (type = given)
Meng-chen
NamePart (type = date)
1986-
DisplayForm
Meng-chen Lo
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zahn
NamePart (type = given)
Jefferey D.
DisplayForm
Jefferey D. Zahn
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shreiber
NamePart (type = given)
David I.
DisplayForm
David I. Shreiber
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kohn
NamePart (type = given)
Joachim
DisplayForm
Joachim Kohn
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Danish
NamePart (type = given)
Shabbar F.
DisplayForm
Shabbar F. Danish
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Brain computer interfaces (BCI) establish communication between the brain and external devices by recording and decoding neural signals and using the signals to drive the devices. Implanted neural microprobes are one means of recording these signals. Despite the short term feasibility of currently available neural prosthetic devices, most of these devices suffer from long term gliosis. In order to address this challenge, it is hypothesized that smaller, more flexible probes that match the mechanical properties of brain tissue could allow better long term integration with neural tissue. The goal of this work is to investigate and understand different device design parameters (e.g., size and material) that might affect brain tissue responses of a long term chronic intracortical neural probe. The miniaturized probe is coated with an ultrafast degrading Tyrosine-derived polycarbonate (E5005(2K)). The polymer is mechanically stiff, which allows it to act as a temporary insertion aid for the probes to penetrate tissue, yet has been designed to degrade within several hours, leaving the flexible probes in place for high fidelity recording. First, a fabrication process was developed incorporating both probe fabrication and polymer coating procedures. The probes were characterized to ensure consistent quality. Second, the probes were evaluated using an in-vivo rat model to assess glial tissue response via immunohistochemistry. Finally, the microfabrication process was expanded to electrically functionalize the probes via metallization, to create electrodes for signal recording. In vivo animal study suggested that both polymer coating and probe sizes play roles in glial scar formation. The larger polymer coating devices introduced more severe glial scar response despite polymer degradation within a few hours post device implantation, which might result from the more severe insertion mechanical trauma. The experimental results also confirmed our hypothesis that the smaller probe/polymer coating devices performed better with minimal glial response compared to the larger probe/polymer coating devices in both short/long terms. Finally, we demonstrated the probe’s recording feasibility using in vitro models, and showed that the electrode remained intact during polymer coating and degradation for the proper device operation. In conclusion, the flexible microprobe with an ultrafast degrading polymer coating as an insertion aid demonstrates promising results to address challenges in electrode-cell interface. Future work will evaluate the electrical recording performance of the miniaturized probe to confirm consistent signal quality while attenuating tissue reaction for prolonged device operation.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Biomedical Engineering
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6714
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xxvii, 169 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Neurons
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Microelectromechanical systems
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Biotechnology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Brain-computer interfaces
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Meng-chen Lo
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3KH0QBQ
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Lo
GivenName
Meng-chen
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-09-08 16:01:50
AssociatedEntity
Name
Meng-chen Lo
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2016-05-01
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 1st, 2016.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
Back to the top
Version 8.5.3
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2024