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Interrogating diasporic identity and media

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TitleInfo
Title
Interrogating diasporic identity and media
SubTitle
distribution flows, reception practices, and video film interpretations of Nollywood audiences in Newark, New Jersey
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shivers
NamePart (type = given)
Kaia Niambi
NamePart (type = date)
1975-
DisplayForm
Kaia Niambi Shivers
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bratich
NamePart (type = given)
Jack Zeljko
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Jack Zeljko Bratich
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Wolfson
NamePart (type = given)
Todd
DisplayForm
Todd Wolfson
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Greenberg
NamePart (type = given)
David
DisplayForm
David Greenberg
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Williams
NamePart (type = given)
Cheryl
DisplayForm
Cheryl Williams
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation examines how the distribution, consumption, and interpretation of “Nollywood” contribute to identity among African-Americans, Africans, and Afro-Caribbeans who live, work, or socialize in Newark, New Jersey. It also shows how the influx of movies from Nigeria and Ghana changes the media landscape of a city that has a place identity of being a “black city.” As well, this research provides a glimpse into the gentrification that is occurring in Newark, where longtime residents and small businesses in downtown Newark are navigating the shifting demographics. To frame identity, I use discourse of black identities and diasporic communicative spaces to capture the discursive practices that occur in the interactions of diasporans. Employing a multi-sited observation of shops and a street vendor, and conducting unstructured and in-depth interviews of African-American, Caribbean, and African Newark residents, I examine how participants employ movies in varied interactions with the film industry. My dissertation shows hybrid, multiple, and sutured identities emerge through the narratives of participants and observations, but participants relinquished strict allegiances to groups when gentrification or exclusion from resources threatened their livelihood. My dissertation also reveals the following: (1) How Nollywood audiences create immaterial sites and physical locations where they engage in cultural performances to make sense of their “distinct” identities. (2) How formal circulations demonstrate trading practices transported by African and Caribbean merchants help shape commercial activities in a predominant African-American city. (3) In the non-commercial flows of Nollywood, four salient forms of circulation emerge, in which I define as borrowing, swapping, gifting and online sharing. (4) Lastly, how groups rely on private and domestic spaces to engage in interactive spectatorship where they embed themselves into the screening of films and resist bourgeoisie expectations of movie-watching conduct rooted in middle-class, dominant culture. After an introduction, (Chapter One) looks at the development of Nollywood, (Chapter Two) establishes the field site, while the conceptual framework and research design are (Chapter Three). The remaining focus on findings with (Chapter Four) looking at distribution, (Chapter Five) examining reception sites and practices, and (Chapter Six) explores interpretation of texts, with a conclusion to end. Each chapter looks at how identity is evoked in interactions of participants.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Communication, Information and Library Studies
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Motion picture industry--Nigeria
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Mass media
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Newark (N.J.)
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6802
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 424 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Kaia Niambi Shivers
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3GF0WHD
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Shivers
GivenName
Kaia Niambi
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = start); (qualifier = exact)
2015-09-29 15:55:26
AssociatedEntity
Name
KAIA SHIVERS
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = start); (qualifier = exact)
2019-01-08
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = end); (qualifier = exact)
2021-01-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after January 31, 2021.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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