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A continuous dual-process accumulation model of recognition judgments

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TitleInfo
Title
A continuous dual-process accumulation model of recognition judgments
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sinha
NamePart (type = given)
Neha
NamePart (type = date)
1982-
DisplayForm
Neha Sinha
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Glass
NamePart (type = given)
Arnold
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Arnold Glass
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Michel
NamePart (type = given)
Melchi
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Melchi Michel
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hemmer
NamePart (type = given)
Pernille
DisplayForm
Pernille Hemmer
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hanson
NamePart (type = given)
Stephen Hose
DisplayForm
Stephen Hose Hanson
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Theories of recognition have shifted from a single process approach to a dual-process view, which distinguishes between knowing that one has experienced an object before (familiarity) and knowing what it was (recollection). The remember/know procedure, in which remember judgments are assumed to reflect recollection and know judgments are assumed to be based on familiarity, is widely used to investigate these two processes. While most recent dual process models can account for relationships among accuracy, remember/know judgments, and study factors that influence recognition (under a range of different assumptions), none of these models address the time course of the recognition process. As a results, paradoxical findings that familiarity is available faster than recollection but remember responses are on average faster than know responses, cannot be convincingly explained by any existing dual process model. In this dissertation, we resolve this paradox by proposing an elaborated dual process model of recognition called the Continuous Dual Process Accumulation (CDPA) model. The CDPA model uses the dual-system hypothesis of mammalian memory (Packard and McGaugh, 1996) as its neurological basis, describing the interplay between the hippocampus and the caudate in making recognition judgments, which allows it to make detailed predictions regarding the time course of recollection and familiarity, and explain how the information available through these two processes is applied to make the recognition decision . In the first half of the dissertation, a neuro-imaging study is presented, which tests a key assumption of the CDPA model that quick familiarity signals are based on perceptual judgments produced by the instrumental system (which includes the hippocampus), while the slower recollection signals require the habit system (which includes the caudate nucleus of the striatum) to generate the memory trace. The second half presents the CDPA model, which is implemented computationally as a collapsing bound diffusion model. A conventional recognition task for previously studied words is used to test the predictions of the model qualitatively and quantitatively. The model therefore extends signal detection theory, and allows, for the first time, predictions of hits and false alarms for remember and know judgments based on confidence, accuracy and RT.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Recognition (Psychology)
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Judgment
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6829
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 110 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Neha Sinha
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3ZC84WX
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Sinha
GivenName
Neha
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-09-29 19:42:16
AssociatedEntity
Name
Neha Sinha
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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