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Three-dimensional computational simulation of multiscale multiphysics cellular/particulate processes in microcirculatory blood flow

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Title
Three-dimensional computational simulation of multiscale multiphysics cellular/particulate processes in microcirculatory blood flow
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Vahidkhah
NamePart (type = given)
Koohyar
NamePart (type = date)
1986-
DisplayForm
Koohyar Vahidkhah
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bagchi
NamePart (type = given)
Prosenjit
DisplayForm
Prosenjit Bagchi
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Computational modeling and simulation is considered to study the concurrent multiscale/multiphysics phenomena associated with cellular/particulate transport in microcirculatory blood flow. The model integrates microhydrodynamics of different blood cells, complexity of vascular geometry, and nanoscale adhesive interactions. A finite element method (FEM) is used to model the cell membrane deformation with high accuracy, and is coupled to the bulk flow motion via a front-tracking method. The geometric complexities are simulated using a sharp-interface immersed boundary method, and the molecular adhesion is coarse-grained via a Monte Carlo method. The following sequence of problems is addressed: (a) Hydrodynamic interaction between a platelet and a red blood cell (RBC) in a dilute suspension: 3D simulations of pairwise hydrodynamic interaction between a platelet and an RBC in a wall-bounded shear flow are conducted. The effects of different dynamics of the RBC, namely tank-treading and tumbling, and the proximity to the wall on platelet trajectories are quantified. Based on the numerical results, a mechanism of continual platelet drift towards the vessel wall is proposed. (b) Platelet transport and dynamics in blood flow: 3D simulations are considered to study the transport of platelets in semi-dense suspension of flowing RBCs. It is found that the local microstructure of RBC suspension provides a fast margination mechanism for platelets to drift towards the blood vessel wall. It is also shown that the anisotropic diffusion of platelets contributes to the formation of platelet clusters, and may act as a hydrodynamic precursor to blood clot formation. (c) Microparticle shape effects on their transport and dynamics in blood flow: The shape effect of microscale targeting drug carriers modeled as platelet-sized microparticles on their margination, near-wall dynamics, and adhesion is quantified and explained by individual particle dynamics and interaction with RBCs. It is shown that the particle shape has entirely different effects on different stages of margination/adhesion cascade. It is suggested that the local hemorheological conditions of the targeted site should be taken into account while selecting the optimum shape for microvascular drug carriers. (d) Blood flow in stenosed microvessels: 3D simulations of cellular motion through stenosed microvessels are considered. The Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is shown to be significantly enhanced, due to the asymmetric distribution of the RBCs caused by the stenosis geometry. Such asymmetry together with the discrete motion of cells are demonstrated to cause an asymmetry in the average as well as the time-dependent flow characteristics along the length of stenosis. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis. (e) Adhesion of microparticles in microvessels – role of RBCs and microparticle deformability: 3D simulations of the adhesion of deformable drug carrier particles in the flow of semi-dense RBC suspension through microvessels are conducted. It is shown that both the presence of RBCs and the particle deformability have a dual role in microparticle adhesion. During the initial formation of adhesive bonds, the RBCs have an enhancing effect while the effect of particle deformation is adverse. In contrast, during the subsequent adhesive rolling of microparticles, the RBCs have an adverse effect while the particle deformation improves stable adhesive rolling motion. It is concluded that to efficiently benefit from the advantages of deformable particles in biomedical targeting, the local blood flow characteristics of the targeted site must be taken into account.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Computer simulation
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Blood flow
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6666
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xxix, 233 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Koohyar Vahidkhah
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T34T6MC8
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Vahidkhah
GivenName
Koohyar
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-08-21 17:09:08
AssociatedEntity
Name
Koohyar Vahidkhah
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2016-05-01
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 1st, 2016.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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