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Structure from motion without projective consistency

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Structure from motion without projective consistency
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
He
NamePart (type = given)
Xiaoli
NamePart (type = date)
1990-
DisplayForm
Xiaoli He
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Singh
NamePart (type = given)
Manish
DisplayForm
Manish Singh
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2016
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2016-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2016
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Structure-from-motion (SFM) studies have shown that people are good at perceiving 3D structure in dynamic dot displays consistent with rigid object rotation. However, observers can perceive volumetric structure even when image motion is inconsistent with rigid rotation. As an extreme case, in dynamic figure-ground displays containing textural motion, observers perceive one set of regions as rotating in 3D, despite constant dot speed everywhere (projectively inconsistent with 3D rotation; Froyen et al. 2013, JOV; Tanrikulu et al., 2013, 2014, VSS). It is unclear, however, to what extent this extreme “tolerance” is due to the figure-ground competition in those displays. Here we used standard SFM displays, depicting a single object in isolation, and manipulated the discrepancy of image motion from 3D rigid rotation. We started not with 3D objects, but with a 2D velocity field within a vertically oriented ellipse. For an ellipsoid rotating about its principal axis, its orthographic-projected speed profile is a cosine function along each orthogonal “rib”. We manipulated the proportion α of cosine speed vs. constant speed (range 0-1), and the motion direction θ relative to the orthogonal ribs (range 0-60°). In experiment 1, observers used a 7-point scale to rate the degree to which the display depicted a volumetric object. In experiment 2, observers adjusted the depth to match the SFM displays. Both experiments shows that the volumetric percepts increased significantly with α, and were surprisingly tolerant to deviations from the projectively correct α=1, θ=0. For α, volumetric ratings increased between 0-0.6 but plateaued beyond 0.6. The effect of θ was surprisingly small, with even θ=45° yielding high volumetric ratings. Then we applied a rigidity-based computer vision model to our displays, and compared the model prediction with observers’ data. The comparison shows that the rigidity-based model does not predict human’s volumetric percepts correctly. In addition, the predicted motion from the model has large deviations from the display itself in terms of rotation axis. Thus even in standard SFM displays, the 3D percept was surprisingly tolerant to discrepancies from projectively correct rigid object motion. These results argue for a more nuanced view of 3D interpretation in which strict projective consistency plays a less prominent role than in conventional SFM accounts.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Visual perception
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Motion
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Form perception
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_7213
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
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application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note
Supplementary File: Demo for experiments
Extent
1 online resource (vi, 38 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = special display note)
by Xiaoli He
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3FJ2JWP
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
He
GivenName
Xiaoli
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2016-04-13 23:16:09
AssociatedEntity
Name
Xiaoli He
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2016-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2017-05-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 31st, 2017.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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ETD
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windows xp
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1.4
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DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2016-04-15T01:44:15
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2016-04-15T01:44:15
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