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Keeping castles out of the sand

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Keeping castles out of the sand
SubTitle
climate change adaptation in northeast coastal communities
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Schechtman
NamePart (type = given)
Judd
NamePart (type = date)
1976-
DisplayForm
Judd Schechtman
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Burchell
NamePart (type = given)
Robert W
DisplayForm
Robert W Burchell
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Popper
NamePart (type = given)
Frank
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Frank Popper
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Andrews
NamePart (type = given)
Clinton
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Clinton Andrews
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Orfield
NamePart (type = given)
Myron
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Myron Orfield
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
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NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
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school
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Text
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theses
OriginInfo
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2016
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2016-05
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2016
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Unprecedented losses from natural disasters in recent years have awakened coastal communities to the increasing risks from climate change. Many are choosing to adapt on their own, yet many others may not know where to begin. To address this gap in knowledge and help disseminate information on adaptation strategies, a mixed-methods study was undertaken to inventory and assess the performance of locally-driven climate adaptation strategies in 34 coastal communities in the Northeast US from Maine to Virginia. Findings revealed that communities are implementing climate change adaptation by using low-cost tools such as comprehensive planning, land use regulations, and building codes far more frequently than using conventional solutions, such as gray infrastructure. Communities are motivated to take action to protect themselves from the hazards of climate change, protect the environment, and respond to constituent demands for action, and less likely to be motivated by elected officials and external incentives such as funding availability or the FEMA Community Rating System (CRS). The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change identified three types of strategies to adapt to sea level rise: accommodation, protection, and retreat. A key finding is that many adaptations, notably most planning activities, do not fit within these three, and hence two new strategies were defined: prevention and procedural. Prevention actions, which preempt development in hazardous locations, such as through land conservation, are important but infrequently utilized. Procedural actions, which generate information or amend processes, plans, and laws, are very commonly adopted. The IPCC is not alone in overlooking these strategies, as data from Superstorm Sandy recovery plans in New York State suggests. However, such strategies are essential because they effect change in a way that makes adaptation standard or routine, result in less community disruption, and require little funding. Innovative action found in every state in the region, and in diverse municipalities with varying demographic and geographic characteristics, demonstrate that it is within communities’ power and interest to adapt to climate change, and they can do so using low-cost tools that support long-term resilience instead of expensive and fallible infrastructure to band-aid vulnerabilities.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Planning and Public Policy
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Climate change mitigation
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Climatic changes--Atlantic Coast (North America)
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_7298
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xiii, 262 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Judd Schechtman
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3VQ34V3
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Schechtman
GivenName
Judd
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2016-04-19 15:33:18
AssociatedEntity
Name
Judd Schechtman
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2016-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2016-11-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after November 30th, 2016.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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2016-04-27T13:34:11
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