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Enzymatic digestibility and ethanol fermentability of AFEX-treated starch-rich lignocellulosics such as corn silage and whole corn plant

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TitleInfo
Title
Enzymatic digestibility and ethanol fermentability of AFEX-treated starch-rich lignocellulosics such as corn silage and whole corn plant
Name (type = corporate); (authority = RutgersOrg-Department)
NamePart
Chemical & Biochemical Engineering
Genre (authority = RULIB-FS)
Article, Refereed
Genre (authority = NISO JAV)
Version of Record (VoR)
OriginInfo
DateIssued (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes)
2010
PhysicalDescription
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
Extent
10 p.
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Citation
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf)
2010
AssociatedObject
Type
Journal
Relationship
Has part
Name
Biotechnology for Biofuels
Identifier (type = volume and issue)
3(12)
Reference (type = url)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1754-6834-3-12
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Abstract (type = abstract)
Background: Corn grain is an important renewable source for bioethanol production in the USA. Corn ethanol is currently produced by steam liquefaction of starch-rich grains followed by enzymatic saccharification and fermentation. Corn stover (the non-grain parts of the plant) is a potential feedstock to produce cellulosic ethanol in second-generation biorefineries. At present, corn grain is harvested by removing the grain from the living plant while leaving the stover behind on the field. Alternatively, whole corn plants can be harvested to cohydrolyze both starch and cellulose after a suitable thermochemical pretreatment to produce fermentable monomeric sugars. In this study, we used physiologically immature corn silage (CS) and matured whole corn plants (WCP) as feedstocks to produce ethanol using ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis (at low enzyme loadings) and cofermentation (for both glucose and xylose) using a cellulase-amylase-based cocktail and a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A (LNH-ST) strain, respectively. The effect on hydrolysis yields of AFEX pretreatment conditions and a starch/cellulose-degrading enzyme addition sequence for both substrates was also studied.

Results: AFEX-pretreated starch-rich substrates (for example, corn grain, soluble starch) had a 1.5-3-fold higher enzymatic hydrolysis yield compared with the untreated substrates. Sequential addition of cellulases after hydrolysis of starch within WCP resulted in 15-20% higher hydrolysis yield compared with imultaneous addition of hydrolytic enzymes. AFEX-pretreated CS gave 70% glucan conversion after 72 h of hydrolysis for 6% glucan loading (at 8 mg total enzyme loading per gram glucan). Microbial inoculation of CS before ensilation yielded a 10-15% lower glucose hydrolysis yield for the pretreated substrate, due to loss in starch content. Ethanol fermentation of AFEX-treated (at 6% w/w glucan loading) CS hydrolyzate (resulting in 28 g/L ethanol at 93% metabolic yield) and WCP (resulting in 30 g/L ethanol at 89% metabolic yield) is reported in this work.

Conclusions: The current results indicate the feasibility of co-utilization of whole plants (that is, starchy grains plus cellulosic residues) using an ammonia-based (AFEX) pretreatment to increase bioethanol yield and reduce overall production cost.
Note (type = peerReview)
Peer reviewed.
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shao
NamePart (type = given)
Qianjun
Affiliation
Michigan State University; Zhejiang Forestry University
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Name (type = personal); (authority = orcid); (authorityURI = http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/identifiers/orcid.html); (valueURI = http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3677-6735)
NamePart (type = family)
Chundawat
NamePart (type = given)
Shishir P. S.
Affiliation
Michigan State University
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Krishnan
NamePart (type = given)
Chandraraj
Affiliation
Michigan State University; Indian Institute of Technology
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bals
NamePart (type = given)
Bryan
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Affiliation
Michigan State University
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sousa
NamePart (type = given)
Leonardo
Affiliation
Michigan State University
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Thelen
NamePart (type = given)
Kurt D.
Affiliation
Michigan State University
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Dale
NamePart (type = given)
Bruce E.
Affiliation
Michigan State University
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Balan
NamePart (type = given)
Venkatesh
Affiliation
Michigan State University
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Name (type = corporate); (authority = RutgersOrg-School)
NamePart
School of Engineering
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Chundawat, Shishir P. S.
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30218100001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3KD215X
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Copyright for scholarly resources published in RUcore is retained by the copyright holder. By virtue of its appearance in this open access medium, you are free to use this resource, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings. Other uses, such as reproduction or republication, may require the permission of the copyright holder.
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Multiple author license v. 1
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2010-05-13T23:21:56
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2010-05-13T23:21:56
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