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Influences of host community characteristics on Borrelia burgdorferi infection prevalence in Blacklegged ticks

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo
Title
Influences of host community characteristics on Borrelia burgdorferi infection prevalence in Blacklegged ticks
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Vuong
NamePart (type = given)
Holly B.
Affiliation
Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources, Rutgers University; Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies; University of Georgia
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Chiu
NamePart (type = given)
Grace S.
Affiliation
Australian National University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Smouse
NamePart (type = given)
Peter E.
Affiliation
Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources, Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fonseca
NamePart (type = given)
Dina M.
Affiliation
Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources, Rutgers University; Entomology, Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Brisson
NamePart (type = given)
Dustin
Affiliation
University of Pennsylvania
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Morin
NamePart (type = given)
Peter J.
Affiliation
Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources, Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ostfeld
NamePart (type = given)
Richard S.
Affiliation
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-Department); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Entomology
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-School); (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (SEBS)
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-Department); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources
Genre (authority = RULIB-FS)
Article, Non-refereed
Genre (authority = NISO JAV)
Accepted Manuscript (AM)
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2016
DateIssued (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
2017
Abstract (type = Abstract)
Lyme disease is a major vector-borne bacterial disease in the USA. The disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, and transmitted among hosts and humans, primarily by blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis). The ~25 B. burgdorferi genotypes, based on genotypic variation of their outer surface protein C (ospC), can be phenotypically separated as strains that primarily cause human diseases – human invasive strains (HIS) – or those that rarely do – and are non-randomly associated with host species. The goal of this study was to examine the extent to which phenotypic outcomes of B. burgdorferi could be explained by the host communities fed upon by blacklegged ticks. In 2006 and 2009, we determined the host community composition based on abundance estimates of the vertebrate hosts, and collected host-seeking nymphal ticks in 2007 and 2010 to determine the ospC genotypes within infected ticks. We regressed instances of B. burgdorferi phenotypes on site-specific characteristics of host communities by constructing Bayesian hierarchical models that properly handled missing data. The models provided quantitative support for the relevance of host composition on Lyme disease risk pertaining to B. burgdorferi prevalence (i.e., overall nymphal infection prevalence, or NIP<sub>All</sub>) and HIS prevalence among the infected ticks (NIP<sub>HIS</sub>). In 2006, we found positive associations of the relative abundances of mice, of chipmunks, and of shrews with NIP<sub>All</sub>. We also found positive associations of NIP<sub>HIS</sub> with shrews, and with host community diversity (H’), but negative associations with mice, and with chipmunks. In 2009, the relative abundance of mice showed a positive association with NIP<sub>All</sub>, whereas the relative abundance of shrews and of H’ showed a negative association. With NIP<sub>HIS</sub>, only H’ showed a positive association, whereas the relative abundances of mice, of chipmunks, and of shrews, had negative associations. Our study highlights the variability between two years in the effects of host composition on B. burgdorferi genotypes. More importantly, our results highlight how disease risk inference, based on the role of host community, changes when we examine risk overall or at the phenotypic level. Long-term studies will be necessary to detect any consistent effects of host community composition on genotypic variation in the Lyme disease spirochetes.
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
PhysicalDescription
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
Extent
61 p.
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Citation
AssociatedObject
Name
PLOS ONE
Type
Journal
Relationship
Has part
Reference (type = url)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0167810
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf)
2017
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Grant award
AssociatedEntity
Role
Funder
Name
U.S. Department of Agriculture
AssociatedEntity
Role
Originator
Name
Peter Smouse
AssociatedObject
Type
Grant number
Name
NJAES 17160
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Smouse, Peter E.
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30184700001
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Morin, Peter J.
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30220600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3B56N2Z
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RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = FS); (ID = rulibRdec0004); (TYPE = [FS] statement #1)
Copyright for scholarly resources published in RUcore is retained by the copyright holder. By virtue of its appearance in this open access medium, you are free to use this resource, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings. Other uses, such as reproduction or republication, may require the permission of the copyright holder.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Multiple author license v. 1
Detail
I hereby grant to Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (Rutgers) the non-exclusive right to retain, reproduce, and distribute the deposited work (Work) in whole or in part, in and from its electronic format, without fee. This agreement does not represent a transfer of copyright to Rutgers. Rutgers may make and keep more than one copy of the Work for purposes of security, backup, preservation, and access and may migrate the Work to any medium or format for the purpose of preservation and access in the future. Rutgers will not make any alteration, other than as allowed by this agreement, to the Work. I represent and warrant to Rutgers that the Work is my original work. I also represent that the Work does not, to the best of my knowledge, infringe or violate any rights of others. I further represent and warrant that I have obtained all necessary rights to permit Rutgers to reproduce and distribute the Work and that any third-party owned content is clearly identified and acknowledged within the Work. By granting this license, I acknowledge that I have read and agreed to the terms of this agreement and all related RUcore and Rutgers policies.
RightsEvent
Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = no); (point = end); (qualifier = exact)
2017-05-06
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = no); (point = start); (qualifier = exact)
2016-12-06
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after: May 6, 2017.
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
Document
CreatingApplication
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1.5
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2016-12-06T09:15:54
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2016-12-06T09:16:38
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Microsoft® Word 2010
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