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Digital Colonization and Virtual Indigeneity: Indigenous Knowledge and Algorithm Bias

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo
Title
Digital Colonization and Virtual Indigeneity: Indigenous Knowledge and Algorithm Bias
Name (authority = orcid); (authorityURI = http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/identifiers/orcid.html); (type = personal); (valueURI = http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-0282)
NamePart (type = family)
Gasparotto
NamePart (type = given)
Melissa
Affiliation
Research & Instructional Services, Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-School); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University Libraries
Genre (authority = RULIB-FS)
Conference Paper or Lecture
Genre (authority = NISO JAV)
Accepted Manuscript (AM)
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
2016
Abstract (type = Abstract)
A growing body of research examining the role of technology in indigenous knowledge production and distribution has helped define the new ways that communities are connecting to each other and organizing around the world. At the same time, social justice activist focus in the United States has turned to the underlying infrastructure of the internet and the ways in which it may in fact hinder these connections, not the least due to the amply documented “filter bubble” which delivers content supporting one’s own existing opinion and may prevent alternate and minority voices from being seen or heard. In an environment where nascent artificial intelligence Twitter bots can become white supremacists within hours, where auto-generated tags classify photos of African Americans as gorillas and where searching Google for “Latina lesbian” delivers only pornography, what exactly does a self-determined representation for any minority group look like online? This paper will examine how we got here and what projects are currently underway to resist the dominant racial classification hierarchies online that help feed algorithm bias. By pulling together two areas of scholarship (online indigenous networks and anticolonial algorithm critique) in the context of current projects giving indigenous communities control over the terms of access to their own web-based cultural production, I hope to suggest alternate ways to think about online information discovery in terms of social justice.
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
PhysicalDescription
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
Extent
20 p.
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Indigenous knowledge
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Algorithm bias
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Internet
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Search engines
Subject (authority = lcsh/lcnaf)
Geographic
Latin America
Note (type = special display note)
Paper submitted to the 2017 Annual Conference of the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM).
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Gasparotto Melissa Collection
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30100900001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3XG9TFG
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Copyright for scholarly resources published in RUcore is retained by the copyright holder. By virtue of its appearance in this open access medium, you are free to use this resource, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings. Other uses, such as reproduction or republication, may require the permission of the copyright holder.
Copyright
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Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Sole author license v. 1
Detail
I hereby grant to Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (Rutgers) the non-exclusive right to retain, reproduce, and distribute the deposited work (Work) in whole or in part, in and from its electronic format, without fee. This agreement does not represent a transfer of copyright to Rutgers.Rutgers may make and keep more than one copy of the Work for purposes of security, backup, preservation, and access and may migrate the Work to any medium or format for the purpose of preservation and access in the future. Rutgers will not make any alteration, other than as allowed by this agreement, to the Work.I represent and warrant to Rutgers that the Work is my original work. I also represent that the Work does not, to the best of my knowledge, infringe or violate any rights of others.I further represent and warrant that I have obtained all necessary rights to permit Rutgers to reproduce and distribute the Work and that any third-party owned content is clearly identified and acknowledged within the Work.By granting this license, I acknowledge that I have read and agreed to the terms of this agreement and all related RUcore and Rutgers policies.
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
Document
CreatingApplication
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1.5
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2016-12-19T14:18:26
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2016-12-19T14:18:26
ApplicationName
Microsoft® Word 2016
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