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Determining human dominance thresholds for Barrier Islands along the New Jersey coast

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TitleInfo
Title
Determining human dominance thresholds for Barrier Islands along the New Jersey coast
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Barone
NamePart (type = given)
Daniel Anthony
NamePart (type = date)
1982-
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Daniel Anthony Barone
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
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NamePart (type = family)
Nordstrom
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Karl F
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Karl F Nordstrom
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Advisory Committee
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chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Robinson
NamePart (type = given)
David A
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David A Robinson
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Holcomb
NamePart (type = given)
Briavel
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Briavel Holcomb
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Jackson
NamePart (type = given)
Nancy L
DisplayForm
Nancy L Jackson
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
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school
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Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2016
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2016-10
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2016
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract
Increased development and subsequent shoreline stabilization practices on barrier islands (i.e. groins, seawalls, bulkheads) suggest thresholds exist at which human dominance supersedes natural geomorphic processes. Geomorphic thresholds are defined by ratios where opposing variables (numerators and denominators) have opposing tendencies. Determining thresholds is important because once a barrier island is human-dominated, physical dynamic processes altering the island are considered undesirable. The research in this dissertation shows human dominance thresholds were reached for New Jersey's eight (8) developed barrier islands by 1962. This finding is based on human and physical factors of historical landscape evolution. A "Developed Barrier Island Life-Cycle" conceptual model was used to identify stages of development along the barrier islands and define when island-scale human dominance occurs. A Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to delineate human and physical land cover types (i.e. urban polygons, barren land polygons and wetland polygons) and additional human variable datasets (i.e. building points, road polylines, shore protection structure polylines) from aerial photographs for every decade between 1920 and 2012. Island-wide, 100m zonal analysis areas (bins) were used along the entire study area to quantify the land cover types and human variable datasets through time. A ratio calculation was used to determine when a human dominance threshold was reached within a given bin. Thresholds were calculated by dividing the area of urban land cover polygons (human factor) by the area of barren land and wetland polygons (physical factor). Results were analyzed at the bin, island, and study area scales. The distribution of human dominance in the study area was compared across the barriers located in the northern "wave-dominated" and southern "mixed energy" geomorphic regions at the three scales to determine if geomorphic classifications influence where and when human dominance occurs. Island mobility was calculated as the standard deviation of the total land cover area (combined urban, barren land, and wetland polygons) within every bin for each year's land cover dataset. Results show that (1) developed barriers experience a state-change, when human activities overshadow natural processes, (2) barrier morphology and geomorphic classifications of barrier type do not dictate when and where a given section of the barrier is human dominated. Morphology of the two barrier types plays a significant role in where humans access barrier islands and when they are initially developed, (3) island mobility correlates with human dominance thresholds at various scales and determines that human agency is a more important factor than shoreline change at the local scale and (4) human dominance at the local scale can be attributed to access via railroads, while the construction of vehicular access bridges and roads induce human dominance at the island-scale.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Geography
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Barrier islands--New Jersey
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Geomorphology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_7533
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 109 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Daniel Anthony Barone
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3QR50DG
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Barone
GivenName
Daniel
MiddleName
Anthony
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2016-09-06 11:04:57
AssociatedEntity
Name
Daniel Barone
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
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License
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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