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"Powers that be"

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TitleInfo
Title
"Powers that be"
SubTitle
apocalyptic and revolutionary narratives of racial capitalism in the United States
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Saboo
NamePart (type = given)
Kartikeya
NamePart (type = date)
1978-
DisplayForm
Kartikeya Saboo
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mascia-Lees
NamePart (type = given)
Fran
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Fran Mascia-Lees
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ghassem-Fachandi
NamePart (type = given)
Parvis
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Parvis Ghassem-Fachandi
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Haugerud
NamePart (type = given)
Angelique
DisplayForm
Angelique Haugerud
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Jackson, Jr.
NamePart (type = given)
John L.
DisplayForm
John L. Jackson, Jr.
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2017-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation analyzes life after the financial crisis and Great Recession of 2007-09 in a neighborhood straddling a major city and small township on the East coast of the United States. Research participants included members of the professional middle class, lower income residents partially dependent on state support, small business and retail outlet workers, men working in the street economy, and a group of radical activists. The oft-invoked category of “crisis”—denoting a critical turning point and a moment calling for decisive action—had an entirely different valence when seen from the viewpoint of these research participants. The dissertation especially focused on: how young black men in and around the street economy organize their experience of dispossession and pervasive violence. These men assimilated the economic cataclysm into the narrative of a Devil Pact and a secret conspiracy that would culminate in a deadly apocalypse called “The Culling;” the relations, practices, and outlook of a sect-like radical collective who viewed the crisis as proof of an inevitable utopian revolution and their vision of leading the masses towards it; the political implications of a struggle between two men in the street economy. Seeking to create and lead a group, they enact an alternative conception of politics that refuses forms of democratic participation from which they are excluded. Comparing the convergence of the utopian vision of the radical collective and the dystopian catastrophe predicted by the young black men, this study argued that tales of conspiracy and fantasies of revolution conform to the logic and structure of occult discourses. These discourses, designated in the anthropological record under terms such as “sorcery” and “witchcraft,” index an experience of pervasive menace, where threats to body and wealth emerge from unexpected sources. Such forms of explanation arise when there is a failure of social norms, reciprocity, and mutual recognition. They, just like paranoiac conspiratorial narratives, bespeak an ambivalent relation to power that promises success but also threatens death. Conspiratorial and radical views also reflect a loss of faith in democratic institutions, free market ideology, and a rejection of the social contract. These responses to the financial crisis and Great Recession allow for a critique of the structural context of long term decline in economic mobility, mass incarceration, and failure of community in an individualistic society living under neoliberal economic and social ideology. Facilitating the extraction of political, symbolic and economic capital, black men emerge as marginal yet integral to the economy and state; placed outside society in prison, or “expended” through internecine or state violence. The hypervisibility of the murdered black body made possible by social movements such as Black Lives Matter must contend with the schisms and shifting alignments of color, contiguity and social class that attenuate possibilities of collective mobilization. The dissertation used mixed methods for data collection including participant observation and interviews (life history, structured, narrative), census data, news reporting, new media, and informal conversations during daily routines of research participants. These included professionals, working families and the unemployed, men in the informal economy, shopkeepers, community leaders, and state functionaries such as lawyers and politicians. Data was also collected from local volunteer groups, church based formations, and independent activists in advocacy forums ranging from street protests to meetings of governmental bodies and public service providers.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Anthropology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_7717
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (viii, 404 p.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Recessions--United States
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Global Financial Crisis, 2008-2009
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Kartikeya Saboo
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3M61NPZ
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Saboo
GivenName
Kartikeya
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2016-10-02 22:22:02
AssociatedEntity
Name
Kartikeya Saboo
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-01-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2019-01-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after January 31st, 2019.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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ETD
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windows xp
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DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2016-10-13T22:04:49
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2016-10-13T22:04:49
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