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Discriminative aversive olfactory learning induces rapid physiological and perceptual plasticity

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TitleInfo
Title
Discriminative aversive olfactory learning induces rapid physiological and perceptual plasticity
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Rosenthal
NamePart (type = given)
Michelle C.
NamePart (type = date)
1978-
DisplayForm
Michelle C. Rosenthal
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
McGann
NamePart (type = given)
John P
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John P McGann
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Otto
NamePart (type = given)
Timothy A
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Timothy A Otto
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bieszczad
NamePart (type = given)
Kasia
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Kasia Bieszczad
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
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internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
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school
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Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2017-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Associative mechanisms allow organisms to learn which stimuli in the environment predict danger. Such learning allows the brain’s sensory systems to increase their sensitivity to ecologically-critical stimuli or optimize discrimination between threat-predictive and neutral stimuli. Here, we used discriminative aversive conditioning in human subjects to explore these interactions between sensory processing and learning. Prior to conditioning we used a triangle task to assess each subject’s ability to discriminate between a pair of very similar odorants and categorized them as baseline discriminators or non-discriminators. Each subject then underwent discriminative conditioning consisted of 8 trials of one of the odorants (the CS+) paired with a co-terminating mild wrist-shock and 8 trials of the other odorant (the CS-) presented alone. Odorants were counterbalanced across subjects and trials were presented in random order. Odorant-evoked skin conductance responses (SCR) were recorded throughout conditioning. Subjects very quickly (within the first few trials) developed a preferential enhancement of the SCR evoked by the CS+ odorant, including the group of non-discriminators that performed poorly on the baseline olfactory assessment. Post-conditioning perceptual testing on a subset of these subjects revealed that these non-discriminators exhibited an impressive improvement in their ability to discriminate the two odorants compared to their own pre-conditioning baselines. Control groups receiving odors without shocks or shocks without odors showed no differential SCR and no improvements in perceptual discrimination. Interestingly, a subset of participants with relatively high levels of trait anxiety (assessed via the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) exhibited much less difference in the SCR to the CS+ and CS- after conditioning compared to participants with normal levels of trait anxiety, which is consistent with previous reports. The results of this study highlight the capacity of the olfactory system for rapid plasticity in response to fear learning.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Smell--Psychological aspects
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Neuroplasticity
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_7853
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (vi, 25 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Michelle C. Rosenthal
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3BP0579
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Rosenthal
GivenName
Michelle
MiddleName
C.
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-01-11 16:23:26
AssociatedEntity
Name
Michelle Rosenthal
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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2017-01-13T11:22:58
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2017-01-13T11:37:23
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