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Multisensory expectations shape olfactory input to the brain

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TitleInfo
Title
Multisensory expectations shape olfactory input to the brain
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Czarnecki
NamePart (type = given)
Lindsey
NamePart (type = date)
1986-
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Lindsey Czarnecki
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
McGann
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John P
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John P McGann
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Vicario
NamePart (type = given)
David
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David Vicario
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gallistel
NamePart (type = given)
Charles
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Charles Gallistel
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Margolis
NamePart (type = given)
David
DisplayForm
David Margolis
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2017-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Mammals spontaneously learn contingencies among sensory stimuli including across sensory modalities. Stimulus recognition is faster and more accurate when cross-modal cues are congruent with previous experience (e.g. Gottfried & Dolan, 2003). This suggests that information from multiple sensory modalities could converge in early sensory processing regions in the brain. In the olfactory system, the olfactory bulb glomerulus receives heavy anatomical top-down projections from brain regions that might contain such information. Using wide-field in vivo imaging of awake head-fixed mice expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP in GABAergic periglomerular (PG) interneurons in the olfactory bulb, neural activity can be evoked not only by odors but also by lights, tones, and whisker deflections. Anesthesia eliminates responses to non- olfactory stimuli and tracheotomy demonstrates that these signals are not driven by respiratory changes. Non-olfactory stimuli were most effective when presented at long inter-stimulus intervals (e.g. > 60 sec), but evoked observable bulbar activity at all intervals tested. To test whether non-olfactory stimuli convey odor-predictive information to the olfactory system, mice were presented with 13 presentations of a light-tone-odor sequence to establish an expectation about the odor. This expectation was subsequently violated by omitting the expected tone while presenting the light and odor as usual. There was an increase in GABAergic interneuron activity during the odor presentation when its preceding tone cue was omitted. Because these interneurons are responsible for presynaptic inhibition of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the primary sensory neurons of the olfactory system, the experiment was repeated in separate animals expressing the exocytosis indicator synaptopHluorin (spH) in OSNs. This revealed a complementary suppression of odorant-evoked neurotransmitter release from OSNs during the odorant presentation in which the tone was unexpectedly omitted. This effect was not observed if mice were anesthetized or if the absence of the tone was unsurprising. Imaging of sniff-by-sniff calcium dynamics in OSN presynaptic terminals revealed that suppression of activity is present on the first inhalation of odorant during the surprising trial. This reduction in presynaptic calcium suggested a GABAB receptor- mediated presynaptic inhibition. Blocking GABAB receptors with CGP35348 abolished the effect of tone omission on odorant-evoked neurotransmitter release. To test whether PG interneurons are sensitive to olfactory expectations in the absence of bottom-up odor information, mice were again presented with the light-tone-odor sequence, but the odor was subsequently omitted. On this odor-omitted trial, the magnitude of GCaMP signals during the time of the expected odor presentation was not significantly different from the previous odor-present trial, but the spatial pattern of activity was diffuse and not obviously glomerular. In a modified paradigm, two different tones were presented with two different odors, with each pairing delivered on 13 interleaved trials. When the odor was then switched such that the tone was unexpectedly followed by the other odorant, the amplitudes of the odor-evoked responses became more similar to each other. These experiments show that non-olfactory stimuli can drive activity in the olfactory bulb and that expectations and violations thereof can shape sensory processing as early as the primary input into the brain.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Senses and sensation
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Olfactory sensors
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Smell--Psychological aspects
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_7790
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (vii, 53 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Lindsey Czarnecki
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T37P91V6
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Czarnecki
GivenName
Lindsey
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2016-12-20 14:26:54
AssociatedEntity
Name
Lindsey Czarnecki
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-01-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2017-08-02
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after August 2nd, 2017.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2016-12-21T17:57:57
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