Staff View
Style chameleons

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Style chameleons
SubTitle
learning to write as an English major
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kairis
NamePart (type = given)
Brynn
DisplayForm
Brynn Kairis
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fitzgerald
NamePart (type = given)
William
DisplayForm
William Fitzgerald
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hostetter
NamePart (type = given)
Aaron
DisplayForm
Aaron Hostetter
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Camden Graduate School
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2017-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This study explores the phenomenon of “style-shifting,” characterized by students’ belief in their ability to readily adapt their writing style to suit the expectations, even idiosyncrasies, of a teacher. Specifically, it analyzes how English majors negotiate assigned papers as highly local rhetorical sites. Understanding to what extent style-shifting occurs reveals how students respond to teachers’ cues and instructional strategies, as well as how individual educational experiences combine to form concepts of disciplinary discourse as a whole. Writing studies scholarship predominantly ignores the role that style plays in the individuated and piecemeal character of learning disciplinary discourses. This study draws from the literature in several fields to understand the various theoretical approaches to “style” and writing pedagogy, as well as how and why students gain disciplinary expertise. Through interviews with literature professors and upper-level undergraduate English majors, as well as textual analysis of papers produced in their classrooms, the study uses a grounded theory methodology to examine the complex rhetorical network of teachers, students, and texts. Broadly, it finds that students do not enact the style shifts they imagine, revealing a burgeoning, but unconscious, awareness of disciplinary discourse conventions. The study constructs a bridge between scholarship on style pedagogy and writing in the disciplines, demonstrating that style can be a generative tool for understanding how students develop disciplinarity.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
English
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8161
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (v, 57 p.)
Note (type = degree)
M.A.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
English language--Rhetoric
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Brynn Kairis
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Camden Graduate School Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10005600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T35H7K1Z
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Kairis
GivenName
Brynn
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = start); (qualifier = exact)
2017-05-01 10:17:46
AssociatedEntity
Name
Brynn Kairis
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Camden Graduate School
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = start); (qualifier = exact)
2017-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = end); (qualifier = exact)
9999-12-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been indefinitely restricted at the author's request.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
CreatingApplication
Version
1.5
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-05-03T14:56:36
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-05-03T14:56:36
ApplicationName
Microsoft® Word 2013
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