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Perestroika

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Perestroika
SubTitle
the last attempt to create the new Soviet person
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Doucette
NamePart (type = given)
Courtney
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Courtney Doucette
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author
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NamePart (type = family)
Hellbeck
NamePart (type = given)
Jochen
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Jochen Hellbeck
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Advisory Committee
Role
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chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Feinberg
NamePart (type = given)
Melissa
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Melissa Feinberg
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Smith
NamePart (type = given)
Bonnie
DisplayForm
Bonnie Smith
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Platt
NamePart (type = given)
Kevin
DisplayForm
Kevin Platt
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2017-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Among the first histories of Perestroika, this dissertation traces late Soviet reform from the election of Mikhail Gorbachev in 1985 through the Soviet collapse in 1991. It reconstructs the imaginary horizons of reformers who saw Perestroika as a response to a pervasive moral crisis, signaled by alienation in the workplace and ennui in society at large. Gorbachev set out to address the crisis by transforming the Soviet population, turning each lethargic person into an actively engaged citizen. In this way, reformers followed in the footsteps of their predecessors, attempting once and for all to create the new Soviet person. This dissertation brings the discussion of Soviet subjectivities to the late Soviet period by showing how central the vision of socialist man was to the design of Perestroika and by delving into the consequences, intended as well as unintended, of the push for reform. The Party state foresaw letter writing as one of the central means of activating the population. From the early Soviet period, the practice of public letter writing distinguished a person as an actively engaged citizen. During Perestroika, citizens used the letter not only to make demands on the state, but to wrestle with their own moral worth in Soviet society. This study delves into previously untapped archives of public letters—a document that became a symbol of reform. In contrast to scholarship that reads public letters as the unfettered expression of the vox populi, this study interprets them in the context of the institutional, social, and political forces that produced them and shaped their meaning. Read in this way, public letters provide an opportunity to explore the mechanisms of popular engagement and subjectivization. The sources show that Soviet citizens under Gorbachev were not defined primarily by apathy or opposition to the state, but were acutely attuned to Soviet politics and actively engaged in a shared effort to improve the workings of the socialist project. The strictly historical methodology employed here resists teleological readings of the period, situates actors in their time, recreates the open-ended historical horizons of the reform project, and takes into view the mostly Soviet and Russian precedents that informed the architects of reform. In so doing, this dissertation challenges studies of Perestroika that view reform as the start of a transition towards liberal capitalism. Beyond Russia and the Soviet Union, this reading of the late Soviet period raises new questions for the study of revolutions in Eastern Europe in 1989 concerning the extent to which socialist notions of ‘man’ shaped emerging political agendas. This study also speaks to research on democratic development at the end of the Cold War, offering a reminder of the multiple models that guided global political change.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
History
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8095
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (x, 333 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Soviet Union--History
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Perestroĭka
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Courtney Doucette
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3M90CJH
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Doucette
GivenName
Courtney
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-04-17 16:27:01
AssociatedEntity
Name
Courtney Doucette
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2019-05-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 31st, 2019.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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ETD
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windows xp
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2017-04-18T23:31:44
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2017-04-18T23:31:44
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