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Application-aware on-line failure recovery for extreme-scale HPC environments

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TitleInfo
Title
Application-aware on-line failure recovery for extreme-scale HPC environments
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gamell Balmana
NamePart (type = given)
Marc
NamePart (type = date)
1989-
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Marc Gamell Balmana
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
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Manish
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Manish Parashar
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Marsic
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Ivan
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Ivan Marsic
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Silver
NamePart (type = given)
Deborah
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Deborah Silver
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Advisory Committee
Role
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Teranishi
NamePart (type = given)
Keita
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Keita Teranishi
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
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outside member
Name (type = corporate)
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Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
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school
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Text
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theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
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2017-05
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2017
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
High Performance Computing (HPC) brings with it the promise of deeper insight into complex phenomena through the execution of various extreme-scale applications, especially those in the fields of science and engineering. The increasing computational demands of these applications continue to push the limits of current extreme scale HPC systems. As a result, the community is working toward achieving exascale systems able to compute 10^18 floating point operations per second (FLOPS). Since these systems are expected to contain a large number of components, reliability is one of the key anticipated challenges. Due to the extensive periods of time that complex applications require, future systems will likely see an increase in process and node failures during application execution. These failures, also known as hard failures, are currently handled by terminating the execution and restarting it from the last stored checkpoint. This checkpoint-restart methodology requires the application to periodically save its distributed state into a centralized, stable storage --an approach that is not expected to scale to future extreme-scale systems. While the illusion of a failure-free machine --implemented either via hardware or system software strategies-- is adequate for current HPC systems, they may prove too costly in future extreme-scale machines. Resilience is, therefore, a key challenge that must be addressed in order to realize the exascale vision. This dissertation explores new models that leverage application-awareness to enable on-line failure recovery. On-line recovery, which does not require the interruption of surviving processes in order to collectively restart the entire application, offers better cost/performance tradeoffs by reducing recovery overheads. Recovering processes on-line enables application-specific data recovery strategies and optimized in-memory checkpointing while avoiding the repetition of initialization procedures --the least optimized part of most production-level applications-- on all processes. This dissertation addresses three areas of research in on-line failure recovery. First, it explores a generic global on-line recovery model, involving all processes in the recovery process. Second, it explores optimized local recovery in which communication characteristics of certain application classes are leveraged to reduce overheads due to failure. In particular, finite difference partial differential equation solvers using stencil operators are used as the driving application class. Third, this dissertation demonstrates how the overhead of multiple, independent failures can be masked to effectively reduce the impact on total execution time. The models presented in this dissertation are implemented and evaluated in Fenix and FenixLR, a pair of generic and extensible frameworks used to demonstrate the concepts.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Fault tolerance (Engineering)
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
High performance computing
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_7888
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xxvi, 235 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Marc Gamell Balmana
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T37P927J
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Gamell Balmana
GivenName
Marc
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-02-20 16:37:46
AssociatedEntity
Name
Marc Gamell Balmana
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2017-02-20T16:16:35
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