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“In real life, you have to speak up”

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TitleInfo
Title
“In real life, you have to speak up”
SubTitle
the civic significance of no-excuses classroom management practices
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Graham
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Eliot James
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1982-
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Eliot James Graham
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author
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Rubin
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Beth
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Beth Rubin
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Abu El-Haj
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Thea Abu El-Haj
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Battey
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Dan
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Dan Battey
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Ben-Porath
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Sigal
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Sigal Ben-Porath
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Advisory Committee
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outside member
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Rutgers University
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degree grantor
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Graduate School - New Brunswick
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theses
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2017
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2017-05
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2017
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The neoliberal focus on the “achievement gap” as the sole measure of educational inequity has contributed to the proliferation of “no-excuses” schools and practices based on the belief that they raise test scores for low-income students of color. This study challenges that conception of equity, asking instead how no-excuses classroom management—highly regimented behavior management techniques increasingly common in schools serving urban youth—impact students’ development as citizens who might act to combat the structural inequalities that frame life in their communities. Drawing upon practice theories of identity, I use ethnographic methods to examine how the day-to-day ways teachers restrict, guide and respond to students’ behavior shape students’ civic development. My findings highlight three major themes: students’ perceptions of institutional authority, relationships to their communities, and sense of self-efficacy or “voice.” Students wanted teachers to use their authority to insist upon safe, respectful environments where learning could occur, and to address misbehavior in ways that were supportive rather than punitive. However, they often experienced school rules as arbitrary and overly restrictive, and rule enforcement as punitive and unfair. Despite their critiques of school rules, students commonly identified themselves and one another as “good kids” or “bad kids” based on whether they tended to get in trouble, and they mirrored school discourse that framed success as an individual endeavor requiring separation from others. Finally, students were immersed in an institutional environment that emphasized the value of compliance and often penalized outspokenness; consequently, though some students chose to “speak up” anyway, they were aware that doing so came with substantial risks. I suggest that these experiences tend to encourage students to view institutional authority as unresponsive and unfair, to be wary of association with others in their community, particularly those who are struggling, and to regulate and repress their own voices in order to comply with institutional expectations and achieve “success.” Furthermore, while similar patterns may be found at many schools serving low-income students of color, I argue that certain features of the no-excuses model make such outcomes particularly likely. Ultimately, these findings challenge the notion that no-excuses practices promote educational equity. They also highlight the need for teachers and scholars to attend to “classroom management” not simply as a means to the end of academic learning, but as a complex pedagogical task with social-emotional, racial and civic significance.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Education
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Educational equalization
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Classroom management
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
Identifier
ETD_7938
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (viii, 301 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Eliot James Graham
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3Z89G8B
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Graham
GivenName
Eliot
MiddleName
James
Role
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RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-04-04 17:52:54
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Name
Eliot Graham
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Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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2017-04-06T17:31:29
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2017-04-06T17:31:29
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