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Application of bacteria from non-cultivated plant relatives to promote growth, alleviate stress, and alter gene expression of cotton

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TitleInfo
Title
Application of bacteria from non-cultivated plant relatives to promote growth, alleviate stress, and alter gene expression of cotton
Name (type = personal)
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Irizarry Caraballo
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Ivelisse
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Ivelisse Irizarry Caraballo
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author
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White
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James F.
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James F. White
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Gianfagna
NamePart (type = given)
Thomas
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Thomas Gianfagna
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zhang
NamePart (type = given)
Ning
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Ning Zhang
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Advisory Committee
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sullivan
NamePart (type = given)
Raymond
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Raymond Sullivan
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Advisory Committee
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outside member
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Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
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Graduate School - New Brunswick
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school
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theses
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2017
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2017-05
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2017
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Beneficial bacterial endophytes are capable of promoting growth and alleviating abiotic and biotic stress in plants. This dissertation will present research that was undertaken to test the overarching hypothesis that non-cultivated relatives of crops in stressed environments possess beneficial bacteria capable of promoting growth and alleviating stress in cultivated plants. This hypothesis will be tested using cotton as a model and will seek bacteria in non-cultivated relatives in the Malvaceae family. Cultivated cotton provides a useful model for these studies because cotton seeds are acid delinted. Acid delinting is a century-old process that involves treating seeds with diluted sulfuric or hydrochloric acid to remove fuzzy lint covering seeds which facilitates cotton seed mass production and reduces the prevalence of seed-borne diseases. This practice likely disturbs the seed-transmitted cotton microbiome and thus, also affects the communities of beneficial microbes that are vertically transmitted to developing cotton seedlings. The research in this dissertation tested whether bacteria from non-cultivated, wild plants in the Malvaceae family in saline and arid areas in Puerto Rico promoted growth, alleviated salt stress, and protected cotton seedlings against seed-borne fungal diseases. Bacteria were isolated that enhanced cotton seed germination and altered the growth of various fungi. Among the bacteria isolated, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens was further demonstrated to promote growth, alleviate salt stress, and alter root architecture of cotton and okra seedlings. Using a GeneChip microarray gene expression analysis, it was demonstrated that inoculating cotton seedling roots with B. amyloliquefaciens led to the differential expression of hundreds of genes in both non-stressed and salt stressed conditions. Many of the differentially expressed genes could contribute to the phenotypic effects observed on inoculated cotton seedlings. Moreover, B. amyloliquefaciens inhibited growth of numerous fungi and produced lipopeptides with antifungal and chlamydospore-inducing properties. Data supported that B. amyloliquefaciens promoted growth and alleviated biotic and abiotic stress of multiple hosts making it a suitable candidate to be used as a biofertilizer and biocontrol agent. Biological agents that enhance plant growth and health have the potential to decrease the demand for nitrogenous fertilizers and fungicides which are costly and detrimental to the environment.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Plant Biology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Cotton--Genetics
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Endophytes
RelatedItem (type = host)
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Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD_7960
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electronic resource
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xvi, 210 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Ivelisse Irizarry Caraballo
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Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3SJ1PGP
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
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Irizarry Caraballo
GivenName
Ivelisse
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Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
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Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-04-07 23:55:04
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Ivelisse Irizarry
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Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
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Author Agreement License
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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2017-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2017-11-30
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Embargo
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Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after November 30th, 2017.
Copyright
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Copyright protected
Availability
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Open
Reason
Permission or license
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