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Assessment, literacy, and identity in the new Latino diaspora

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TitleInfo
Title
Assessment, literacy, and identity in the new Latino diaspora
Name (type = personal)
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McConnochie
NamePart (type = given)
Meredith Clay
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1982-
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Meredith Clay McConnochie
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author
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Mangual Figueroa
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Ariana
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Ariana Mangual Figueroa
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Abu El-Haj
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Thea
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Thea Abu El-Haj
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Flores
NamePart (type = given)
Nydia
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Nydia Flores
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Rymes
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Betsy
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Betsy Rymes
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Advisory Committee
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outside member
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Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
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NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
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school
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theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
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2017-05
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2017
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation project represents a 2.5-year ethnographic study in a second-grade bilingual classroom and the homes of seven emergent bilingual children of Mexican-origin. This study examines how educational assessment policies shape the ways in which emergent bilingual children are socialized to express social and academic identities during literacy events. The data includes school-based artifacts such as assignments and benchmark assessments, over 200 hours of audio-recorded interactions during routine activities such as independent writing at school and homework completion at home, and informal interviews with administrators, teachers, Mexican-born mothers, and the focal children. The findings of the study show that elementary-school administrators and teachers implement classroom-based assessments and develop “pedagogical remedies” aimed at monitoring student progress and increasing student achievement on federal- and state-mandated tests of academic performance. Pedagogical remedies have two important features: first, they are informed by ideologies regarding effort and intelligence related to language learning; and second, they are enacted through classroom pedagogy and school language policy. The analysis specifically tracks the ways in which teachers and emergent bilingual students, along with their peers and immigrant parents, interpret and implement pedagogical remedies such as homework assignments and peer groupings. As teachers, parents, and students interpreted and implemented pedagogical remedies during routine classroom and household activities, they socialized the second-grade emergent bilingual students to express identities as ‘hard-working’ and ‘smart’ students. These remedies were rooted in conflicting values of individualism and cooperation, ideologies that prioritize speed and the mechanics of written English literacy, and school language policies that position Spanish as an instructional tool but not a linguistic and academic goal. Seeking to fulfill teachers’ expectations for performance on assessments, immigrant mothers drew upon bilingual resources to socialize children to develop test-taking behaviors during homework completion. Second-grade emergent bilingual students engaged meaningfully in peer helping routines by translating and giving bilingual directives, but resorted to copying English texts to insure accuracy when help was unavailable or denied. This study helps to identify how educational assessments and classroom-level interventions can limit or provide opportunities for meaningful teacher-student, peer-peer, and parent-child interactions. With the recent federal authorization of Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), states have been granted greater autonomy over assessment and accountability measures. This study can inform state-level educational policymakers, school administrators, and educators to make decisions about which assessments and interventions best support emergent bilinguals’ language and literacy learning.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Education
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
English language--Study and teaching (Elementary)--Foreign Speakers
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Second language acquisition
RelatedItem (type = host)
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
Identifier
ETD_8080
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
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application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (ix, 214 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Meredith Clay McConnochie
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3CN76SH
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
McConnochie
GivenName
Meredith
MiddleName
Clay
Role
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RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-04-17 11:05:07
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Name
Meredith McConnochie
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Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
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License
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2017-05-09T13:34:05
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