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Framing in science communication

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Framing in science communication
PartName
influencing the publics’ behavior towards the environment
Name (type = personal)
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Sorensen
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Amanda
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Amanda Sorensen
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author
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Jordan
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Rebecca C
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Rebecca C Jordan
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Lockwood
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Julie
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Julie Lockwood
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Golan Duncan
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Ravit
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Ravit Golan Duncan
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Campbell
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Lindsay
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Lindsay Campbell
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Advisory Committee
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outside member
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Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
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Graduate School - New Brunswick
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school
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Text
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theses
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DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
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2017-05
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2017
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Our current geological period, known as the Anthropocene (from the industrial revolution to present), is characterized by scholars as the time in which humans have had a disproportionate, often negative, impact on the earth’s bio-physical systems. Global climate change is arguably the major issue to emerge from this human impact and has been cited as a driver, or aggravator, of many ecological problems (e.g., phenology shifts and mismatches, invasive species establishment, biodiversity loss). Beyond the bio-physical threats climate change poses, addressing climate change issues through policy and individual action has been particularly problematic because it has been subject to politicization through active media campaigns to highlight uncertainties in climate science to sow doubt of climate change’s existence. This rampant politicization of science, particularly climate science, makes it an especially difficult issue to address. Scholars have suggested that direct engagement with local communities and persuasive science communication as two opportunities to combat these misinformation campaigns and influence public decision-making. This area of how communication influences public behavior and outcomes has been little explored in the ecological literature, and even less so the intentional employment of frame theory from the communication sciences. In this dissertation, I aim to investigate how framing ecological science communication can affect the outcomes (e.g., science literacy, trust of science, behavior change, valuation of the issue, support for science), in the context of public participatory research (e.g., citizen science) and direct scientists-to-public interfacing, in the overarching context of climate change. In my first chapter, I investigate what minimum scale of re-framing climate issues showed significant response from participants. Particularly, this work seeks to answer, can we elicit positive responses towards environmental issues from identity groups who would otherwise not be supportive of climate change intervention. In my second chapter, I test how framing of scientist-driven public engagement (i.e., citizen science) impacts outcomes for participants (science literacy, trust and views of science) using the principles highlighted in chapter 1. In my third chapter, I developed a framework for employing framing in communicating ecological issues by practitioners. The results of my dissertation research can influence and improve how practitioners of science and science communication create and disseminate messages about their science to elicit particular responses and behaviors from the public.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Ecology and Evolution
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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ETD_7917
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electronic resource
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (vii, 86 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Climatic changes
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Science--Social aspects
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Amanda Sorensen
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore19991600001
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Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3BC42GM
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Sorensen
GivenName
Amanda
Role
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RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-03-30 20:55:36
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Name
Amanda Sorensen
Role
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Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2018-05-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 31st, 2018.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2017-04-03T18:01:11
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