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Contesting the university

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Contesting the university
SubTitle
black student movements in America and South Africa between 1968-1972 and 2015
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Cadden
NamePart (type = given)
Luke Aron
NamePart (type = date)
1993-
DisplayForm
Luke Aron Cadden
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Feldstein
NamePart (type = given)
Ruth
DisplayForm
Ruth Feldstein
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2017-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This thesis analyzes the factors that lead to universities being contested by black radical students in the context of black intellectual/liberation movements in South Africa and the United States between 1968 – 1972 and the year 2015. Given the parallel historical similarities of the racialized capitalist system operative in South Africa and the United States respectively, the comparative framework of the thesis is split between two chapters. The first chapter historicizes the influence of the Black Consciousness Movement on the South African Students Organisation, as well as the Black Power and the Black Campus Movement in the US. The chapter suggests that, while locally manifested, the proliferation of black intellectual/liberation movements owes much to transnational/diasporic origins, since scholars recognized the shared struggle of fighting racial oppression globally. Emboldened by new notions of self-pride and positive affirmations of blackness, these ideas galvanized black radical student activists into action, beginning at historically black colleges and universities and later developing elsewhere, with the goal of transformation at a university as well as societal level. Chapter Two bridges the two historical periods of focus, by discussing the origins of the myth of post-racialism in both contexts, which emerged alongside the attrition of the movements discussed in the preceding chapter. Indeed, despite the different origins and rationale, the thesis demonstrates that paradigm shifts in both countries were complicit in the implementation of a colorblind national discourse, which shifted the political-social understanding of race and racism. In America, the myth of colorblindness has its origins in the Nixon era which formed part of a wider political strategy to stymie the hard-fought efforts of the Black Power/Civil Rights activists who elucidated the connections between race, racism and economic inequality. Relatedly, colorblindism in South Africa has been at the center of the post-apartheid political narrative since 1994, effectively supplanting race discourse with individualism and meritocracy. Yet for student activists in 2015, the continued systematic decimation of black bodies during a time when both countries’ presidential offices were held by black men, presented a challenge to the notion of post-racialism. Thus, the university, once again, became central for black radical student activists. The thesis argues that this is to be understood in the overarching context of the Black Lives Matter in America and Fees Must Fall in South Africa. Attentive to the struggle of the previous generation of activism as well as the nuances of the 2015 context, the Open Stellenbosch and Concerned Student 1950 collective fought for more just universities as well as equitable societies.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
History
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Students, Black--Political activity--South Africa--History
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Students, Black--Political activity--United States--History
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Student movements
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Identifier
ETD_8173
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3ZP491C
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (vi, 96 p.)
Note (type = degree)
M.A.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Luke Aron Cadden
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Cadden
GivenName
Luke
MiddleName
Aron
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-05-01 20:36:01
AssociatedEntity
Name
Luke Cadden
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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ETD
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windows xp
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DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-06-09T07:57:13
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-06-09T07:57:13
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