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Open government performance

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TitleInfo
Title
Open government performance
SubTitle
an analytical framework for organizational design
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ingrams
NamePart (type = given)
Alex
NamePart (type = date)
1982-
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Alex Ingrams
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author
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Holzer
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Marc
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Marc Holzer
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Advisory Committee
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chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Piotrowski
NamePart (type = given)
Suzanne J
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Suzanne J Piotrowski
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Advisory Committee
Role
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co-chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zhang
NamePart (type = given)
Yahong
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Yahong Zhang
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Meijer
NamePart (type = given)
Albert J
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Albert J Meijer
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
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outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
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school
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theses
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2017
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2017-05
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2017
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation addresses the topic of open government design and performance. Open government reforms are increasingly numerous worldwide. This study seeks to develop analytical concepts and models to understand internal organizational changes that take place in public agencies when they implement open government reforms, and how these designs can be evaluated. The central research question posed by the dissertation is: ‘What is the association between organizational design and open government performance?’ In addressing this question, the focus is on three components of organization design in open government programs: organizational structure, organizational processes, and the macro-factors that shape organizational design. There are two sub-questions within the central research question: (1.1) ‘How does organizational structure contribute to open government performance?’; (1.2) ‘How does organizational process contribute to open government performance?’ Additionally, a secondary question addresses the macro-level factors of organizational design and performance: (2) Do macro-level factors shape organizational design capacity in open government? To address these questions a mixed methods approach is taken, involving content analysis, two case studies, and regression analysis. The case studies involve document analysis, participant observation, and 35 semi-structured interviews with senior decision-makers working on two open government programs in the United Kingdom and United States as part of the Open Government Partnership (OGP), a multi-country compact to promote openness in government. These case studies are of a healthcare services and a law enforcement open government program, respectively. The core result of the dissertation is the establishment of an analytical framework of open government processes. The framework includes key performance indicators that can be used to evaluate open government structures and processes. This framework is comprised of four structural factors: institutional, environmental, technological, and managerial, and three themes of the organizational processes: consultation, governance, and strategy. The dissertation concludes with discussion of how the results contribute to public administration theory on open government. The study extends scholarly understanding of how organizational design factors are crucial to open government performance. Public managers, who work at the intersection of organization and environment, must navigate complex inter-organizational information and tasks. By developing an analytic framework of such work, this dissertation offers knowledge of organizational design that can be used in an area of reform currently being adopted by many different types of country governments and at different governmental levels.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Public Administration (SPAA)
RelatedItem (type = host)
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_7981
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xiv, 269 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Transparency in government
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Alexander Ingrams
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3QV3QGB
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Ingrams
GivenName
Alex
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-04-11 11:47:09
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Name
Alex Ingrams
Role
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Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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2017-04-26T04:46:27
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-04-26T04:46:27
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