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Crystal investigations of forensically important drugs

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TitleInfo
Title
Crystal investigations of forensically important drugs
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Wood
NamePart (type = given)
Matthew R.
NamePart (type = date)
1969-
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Matthew R. Wood
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author
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Lalancette
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Roger A
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Roger A Lalancette
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Mendelsohn
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Richard
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Richard Mendelsohn
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pietrangelo
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Agostino
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Agostino Pietrangelo
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Advisory Committee
Role
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Brettell
NamePart (type = given)
Thomas A
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Thomas A Brettell
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
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outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
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school
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Text
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theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
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2017-05
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2017
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Microcrystal tests have been used in chemical identification for over 150 years. The tests involve the addition of a crystallizing reagent to a test sample followed by the microscopic observation of characteristic crystals. While this technique predates modern instrumental techniques of chemical analysis, it still has several distinct advantages. Microcrystal tests are rapid, inexpensive, and fairly simple to perform. However, this technique suffers from several criticisms due to the lack of atomic-level structural data from the resulting crystals. The crystallizing reagent, 5% chloroauric acid prepared from gold(III) chloride in water or dilute hydrochloric acid, is one of the most common reagents used in forensic laboratories in the analysis of suspected drug substances. The crystals precipitating from the reaction of this reagent and illicit substances from three categories of drugs were examined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Cocaine is one of the most widely abused drugs, worldwide. Cocaine produces well characterized microcrystals upon mixing with the gold (III) chloride reagent. Ecgonine, the final stable metabolite of cocaine, is structurally similar to the parent drug and also forms crystals when reacted with gold (III) chloride. The gold (III) chloride salts of cocaine and ecgonine (hydrated and anhydrous) and the hydrochloride salt of ecgonine were determined and compared by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Single crystals precipitated from the addition of gold chloride test reagent to several structurally similar phenethylamines: amphetamine, methamphetamine, and ephedrine. While all of the other drugs of this category formed salts with the gold chloride anion, amphetamine was the only compound to bind covalently to the gold atom, displacing two chlorides. In recent years, various cathinone-derived drug products have entered the illicit drug market. Ethylone, α-PVP, pentylone, dibutylone, ephylone, and 3,4-methyl¬ene¬dioxy¬pyrovalerone (MDPV) were analyzed by single crystal X-ray diffraction in various salt forms, including the product of the gold chloride crystal test with MDPV. While the use of gold (III) chloride as a crystal precipitating agent is well-established, it is expensive and does not always form crystals with certain drug compounds. The novel application of Erdmann’s salt as a crystal precipitating reagent was successfully tested with a representative candidate from each of the previously described classes and the resulting crystals were structurally characterized.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Chemistry
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Forensic sciences
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8157
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xxi, 274 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Matthew R. Wood
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T34Q7XXH
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Wood
GivenName
Matthew
MiddleName
R.
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-04-30 20:25:46
AssociatedEntity
Name
Matthew Wood
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2018-05-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 31st, 2018.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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2017-04-30T20:35:02
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2017-04-30T20:35:02
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