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Neural plasticity of early sensory pathways in the adult mouse olfactory system

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TitleInfo
Title
Neural plasticity of early sensory pathways in the adult mouse olfactory system
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kass
NamePart (type = given)
Marley Deena
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1985-
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Marley Deena Kass
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author
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NamePart (type = family)
McGann
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John P
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John P McGann
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Shors
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Tracey
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Tracey Shors
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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NamePart (type = family)
Otto
NamePart (type = given)
Timothy
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Timothy Otto
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Advisory Committee
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Wilson
NamePart (type = given)
Donald
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Donald Wilson
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
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NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
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school
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Text
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theses
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DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
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2017-10
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2017
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Conventional wisdom suggests that the body’s sensory systems should be consistent, so that a given sensory stimulus always produces more-or-less the same signal to the brain, which can then retrieve related memories or information. However, using optical neurophysiological tools to observe the earliest parts of the mouse olfactory system, we have found that actually these signals are highly flexible, such that different sensory experiences and previously learned information radically affect the way sensory stimuli are processed in the brain. The first stage of sensory processing in the olfactory system takes place in the olfactory bulb, where axons from olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the nose segregate by receptor type and converge into one or two glomeruli on the surface of the bulb. The brain’s initial (primary) neural code for the identity of an odor in the nose is thus the spatiotemporal pattern of olfactory bulb glomeruli receiving synaptic input from OSNs, which can be modulated by local circuits in the glomerular layer of the bulb. Here, we demonstrate that these primary odor representations are changed in vivo through simple environmental manipulations, such as olfactory sensory deprivation or odor exposure. Subsequent experiments show that passive odor exposure leads to changes in temporal patterns of OSN synaptic output that are correlated with perceptual changes in odor quality. We move on from simple environmental manipulations to explore how emotional learning can influence early sensory processing, and surprisingly find that discriminative olfactory fear conditioning can selectively enhance the synaptic output of OSNs during the presentation of threat-predictive odorants. By contrast, when conditioned fear generalizes across olfactory stimuli that are quite different from a threat-predictive odor, there is a corresponding facilitation of odor-evoked activity in inhibitory interneurons in the olfactory bulb that generalizes across threatening and non-threatening odors. These experience-dependent effects may be further modulated by individual differences in endogenous factors such as the expression of certain transduction proteins or circulating levels of sex hormones that can independently shape primary sensory odor representations. Collectively, the results from these experiments demonstrate that early neural representations of odors are highly malleable on the basis of prior sensory experience and learning, even as early as the primary sensory input to the brain. Such plasticity presumably maximizes the detection and discrimination of meaningful sensory stimuli in a constantly changing olfactory environment, and is of broad importance for downstream brain regions that receive input from the bulb.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Smell
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Neuroplasticity
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
Identifier
ETD_8288
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electronic resource
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xii, 318 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Marley Deena Kass
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T36D5X4Z
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Kass
GivenName
Marley
MiddleName
Deena
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-08-11 10:47:48
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Name
Marley Kass
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Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2018-05-02
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 2nd, 2018.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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