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Exploring communication of compulsive gamers and their loved ones

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TitleInfo
Title
Exploring communication of compulsive gamers and their loved ones
SubTitle
a tensional approach
Name (type = personal)
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Ki
NamePart (type = given)
Seol
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Seol Ki
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author
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Gibbs
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Jennifer
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Jennifer Gibbs
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Faw
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Meara
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Meara Faw
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Scott
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Craig
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Craig Scott
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Caplan
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Scott
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Scott Caplan
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Advisory Committee
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outside member
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NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
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Text
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theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2017
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2017-10
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2017
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
With the increasing popularity of online games, compulsive gaming has emerged as an important social issue. Previous scholarship, especially from pathological perspectives, tends to focus on the effects of compulsive gaming on the gamer only at individual level, overlooking dynamic interpersonal communication processes between gamers and their loved ones (e.g., family, romantic partners, or friends). However, the compulsive gaming (so-called game addiction) does not exist in a vacuum; compulsive gamers and their loved ones experience and deal with complex interpersonal relationship issues specific to unhealthy gaming. The current study focuses on three particular online support groups that are designed for (recovering) compulsive online gamers and their loved ones where they share social support to cope with their problems associated with compulsive gaming. Assuming compulsive online gaming and online social support are two interrelated aspects of internet use, this study examines the associations among compulsive gaming, gaming-related partner-control, gaming-specific relational conflict, and online social support. Drawing upon Relational Dialectics theory (Baxter & Montgomery, 1996), Inconsistent Nurturing as Control theory (Le Poire, 1995), and Buffering Effect model of Social Support (Cobb, 1976; Cohen & Wills, 1985), the current study poses18 hypotheses that link six study variables: compulsive gaming, partner-control, and relational conflict at offline level, and online support group participation, support group identification, and social support at online context. Findings of an online survey of both gamers (N=103) and loved ones (N=57) supported the hypothesized positive associations between (a) compulsive gaming and consistent partner-control, (b) offline relational conflict and online support group participation level, (c) online support group participation and the amount of received online social support, and (d) online social support and online support group identification. The hypothesis on the mediating effects of relational conflict on online support group participation was also supported, indicating that (e) relational conflict between gamers and loved ones mediates the associations between partner-control and online support group participation. This implies the important roles of both partner’s controlling strategies and relationship problems in predicting online support group use for both compulsive gamers and their loved ones. Another path was found that (f) gamer’s received online social support mediates the impact of positive partner-control on gamer’s online support group participation. This suggests that positive reinforcement from non-gaming partner in tandem with online social support from other fellow recovering gamers predicts the level of online support group participation of recovering gamers. Overall, the quantitative findings highlight the important role of the loved ones of gamers in both gamer’s dyadic relational conflicts offline and collective recovery process (social support) online. In addition, qualitative interviews (N=20) found two overarching dialectics between (g) expression and privacy in the online support forum as well as (h) nurturing and controlling in offline relationships. 11 tension management strategies (e.g., selection, vacillation, separation, hybrid sense-making) were also identified and discussed along with specific instances of micro control strategies of loved ones (13 tactics) and gamers’ responses (10 reactions), respectively. This dissertation contributes to expanding the scholarship of problematic internet use, relationship tensions, and online social support. Moreover, discovering and highlighting the important role of the loved ones offers practical insights into the treatment of compulsive online gaming. This study also contributes to communication research with an integrated model of compulsive gaming, partner-control, relational conflict, and online social support group dynamics, which helps gamers, loved ones, scholars, and health practitioners understand the complexly interrelated problematic vs. supportive internet uses at the individual, interpersonal, and group level.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Communication, Information and Library Studies
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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ETD_8394
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electronic resource
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (viii, 150 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Video game addiction
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Seol Ki
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
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Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3S75KGV
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Ki
GivenName
Seol
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-09-25 06:55:26
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Name
Seol Ki
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Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2019-10-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 31st, 2019.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2017-09-28T20:36:59
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-09-28T20:36:59
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