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A qualitative survey of the origins of multi-dimensional perfectionism and the experiences of perfectionists and non-perfectionists

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TitleInfo
Title
A qualitative survey of the origins of multi-dimensional perfectionism and the experiences of perfectionists and non-perfectionists
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ballou-Broadnax
NamePart (type = given)
Traci
NamePart (type = date)
1985-
DisplayForm
Traci Ballou-Broadnax
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Riggs Skean
NamePart (type = given)
Karen
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Karen Riggs Skean
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Boyd-Franklin
NamePart (type = given)
Nancy
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Nancy Boyd-Franklin
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
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school
TypeOfResource
Text
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theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2018
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2018-01
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2018
Place
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xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Perfectionism is a complex construct with numerous implications for understanding and treating the emotional distress seen in many college students. Existing literature provides fairly consistent descriptions of the characteristics of individuals with perfectionism; however, it lacks causal explanations for questions such as: (a) why some individuals develop perfectionism but not others, (b) why perfectionism manifests in a multi-dimensional nature, or (c) why the emotional and behavioral correlates of perfectionism co-occur and correlate with the dimensions of perfectionism as they do. This exploratory study investigated these questions in order to generate hypotheses for future empirical studies designed to further understand the construct. Participants were 58 undergraduate and graduate students, 46 women and 12 men, with a mean age of 21.9 years. Participants completed an online survey consisting of the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS; Hewitt & Flett, 1991); a qualitative questionnaire exploring participant attitudes about goals and success, experiences with success and failure, relationships with caregivers, and self-perceptions; and a demographic questionnaire. Responses were grouped into one of four categories based on participant MPS scores—Self-Oriented Perfectionists (14 participants), Socially Prescribed Perfectionists (13 participants), High Self-Oriented/High Socially Prescribed Perfectionists (16 participants), and Non-Perfectionists (15 participants)—and then analyzed using an abbreviated version of grounded theory (Corbin & Strauss, 2014; Willing, 2013). Findings were largely consistent with existing literature, particularly related to self-oriented perfectionists’ focus on personal standards, how heavily attitudes and expectations of others influenced socially prescribed perfectionists, and the differential impact of parental flexibility and support versus harsh demands and criticism. The inclusion of non-perfectionists and individuals high in both types of perfectionism allowed for novel findings including strong similarities in the attitudes and experiences of non-perfectionists and self-oriented perfectionists, and that self-oriented characteristics may mitigate socially-prescribed characteristics for individuals high in both types of perfectionism resulting in less distress than typically assumed. Areas for future exploration were also identified, including how the development of perfectionism is impacted by having caregivers who were raised outside of the U.S., by being able to experience pride or ownership in successes, or by the degree of personal and caregiver acceptance in response to failures.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Clinical Psychology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8575
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (viii, 244 p.)
Note (type = degree)
Psy.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Perfectionism (Personality trait)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Traci Ballou-Broadnax
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001800001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T30Z76FQ
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Ballou-Broadnax
GivenName
Traci
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-12-19 13:46:17
AssociatedEntity
Name
Traci Ballou-Broadnax
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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ETD
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2017-12-19T13:43:07
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-12-19T13:43:07
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