Staff View
Three essays on contagion and network issues

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Three essays on contagion and network issues
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sun
NamePart (type = given)
Zhengjie
NamePart (type = date)
1989-
DisplayForm
Zhengjie Sun
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Jaggi
NamePart (type = given)
Bikki
DisplayForm
Bikki Jaggi
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kedia
NamePart (type = given)
Simi
DisplayForm
Simi Kedia
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gao
NamePart (type = given)
Feng
DisplayForm
Feng Gao
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Livnat
NamePart (type = given)
Joshua
DisplayForm
Joshua Livnat
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2018
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2018-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation consists of three essays that examine contagion and network-related issues. In the first essay, we document that the contagion effect of earnings management is much broader than documented by Chiu, et al (2013). We find that firms are exposed to the spillover effect of earnings management by contagious firms when directors on their corporate boards also serve as directors on corporate boards of other firms at the same time and even when the contagious firms do not restate their reported earnings. These findings thus confirm that earnings management behavior, measured by absolute discretionary accruals, spills over from contagious firms to other firms with common corporate board directors. The contagion effect is stronger as the number of interlinked directors between contagious and affected firms increases, and it is especially stronger when interlinked directors have accounting expertise. We, however, do not find a stronger contagion effect of directors with finance expertise or any other non-accounting expertise. Furthermore, we do not find any significant difference in the contagion effect when institutional shareholdings in the Affected firms are significant or interlinked directors are independent or executive. The second essay examines the contagion effect of SEC comment letters through auditor offices. Using 7,451 initial comment letters for 10-K filings during the years 2005-2015, we discover that firms are more likely to receive comment letters after the SEC discovered a material deficiency in clarity or explanation in the 10-K filings of their industry peers audited by the same auditor office. Such contagion effect is only observable in auditor office whose clients receive accounting-related comment letters, and is attenuated by auditor office size. We also find that auditor offices develop expertise in resolving comment letters. Particularly, their client firms experience lower remediation costs (i.e., fewer topics in comment letters and fewer rounds of conversations) of addressing 10-K comment letters in the subsequent years. Overall, findings in this paper suggest that auditor offices are an important channel from which the SEC identifies firms in the comment letter review process. In the third essay, we collect data on the career paths of accountants who work at the SEC to examine the effect of revolving doors on their effort while at the SEC. We examine outbound accountants, that is accountants who leave the SEC for jobs at big four accounting firms. We also examine inbound accountants that are hired by the SEC from the big four accounting firms. We find no systematic evidence that the regulatory effort (as captured by the severity of the comment letters they issue) of outbound and inbound accountant is different from others. The exceptions are 1) outbound accountants that join big 4 firms issue less severe comment letters to clients of their prospective employer in the last year of service at the SEC and 2) inbound accountants that are hired from the big four accounting firms issue less severe comment letters to clients of their prior employer in the first year of their service at the SEC. The evidence points to some detrimental effect of revolving doors for accountants.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Management
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8608
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (x, 143 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Earnings management
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Zhengjie Sun
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T35H7KGS
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Sun
GivenName
Zhengjie
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-01-03 12:14:29
AssociatedEntity
Name
Zhengjie Sun
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
CreatingApplication
Version
1.7
ApplicationName
Microsoft® Word 2016
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-01-18T07:04:35
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-01-18T07:04:35
Back to the top
Version 8.5.3
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2024