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Influence of food matrix physico-chemical properties on the biophysics of digestion and in situ luminal viscosity

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TitleInfo
Title
Influence of food matrix physico-chemical properties on the biophysics of digestion and in situ luminal viscosity
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Alhasawi
NamePart (type = given)
Fatemah M.
NamePart (type = date)
1987-
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Fatemah M. Alhasawi
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ludescher
NamePart (type = given)
Richard D
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Richard D Ludescher
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Rogers
NamePart (type = given)
Michael A
DisplayForm
Michael A Rogers
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Karwe
NamePart (type = given)
Mukund V
DisplayForm
Mukund V Karwe
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Corradini
NamePart (type = given)
Maria G
DisplayForm
Maria G Corradini
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2018
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2018-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Designing foods by modifying their form is becoming a plausible strategy to control how foods behave and are digested in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Given the global persistence of the type II diabetes and obesity, there is a great need for dietary interventions that target postprandial glucose levels and rate of lipolysis. A well-established structure-function relationship is found between increased viscosity and rate and extent of macronutrient hydrolysis. Nonetheless, the mechanisms underlying such relationships within specific food commodities as a function of GI viscosity are not yet well identified, especially in light of the confinements in the currently available methods for monitoring GI luminal viscosity. A critical review was compiled to summarize the main characteristics of molecular rotors (MR)s, a class of optical probes that are sensitive to microviscosity, their current applications in biological research and their current and potential applications as sensors of physical properties in food science and engineering. MRs were integrated with TNO Intestinal Model-1 (TIM-1) in a novel method to facilitate detection of in situ changes in luminal viscosity during in vitro GI digestion, respectively. This method was verified using maize starch samples that varied in their amylose-to-amylopectin ratio, and is applicable when microviscosity is representative of bulk viscosity. We were able to correlate food form, and digestion kinetics in several food matrices. Carbohydrate digestion kinetics and in vitro gastric viscosity of three commercially available oat products, instant oats (IO), steel cut oats (SC), and oat bran (OB), were assessed. Findings included: rate of starch digestion in IO > OB > SC; IO and OB viscosities were highest at the onset of digestion and decreased with time, whereas SC onset viscosity was lowest and increased with time. IO- and SC-based meals were modified by addition of a thickening agent, milk protein concentrate (MPC), at concentrations: 0 g, 5 g, and 10 g. Oat-based meals containing 5 g or 10 g MPC yielded significantly less total bioaccessible sugar, a more rapid rate of starch digestion, and higher gastric viscosity compared with those containing 0 g MPC. Physico-chemical properties of human breast milk were compared to four SimilacTM infant formulas, and correlated with in vitro free fatty acid bioaccessibility. Breast milk samples were distinctly unique from the infant formulas: having lower viscosities as a function of pH (pH 6.5 to 3.0), a lag period during lipid digestion, and a higher rate of lipolysis. These findings suggest that modification of food form and formulation alters macronutrient bioaccessibility and luminal viscosity.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Food Science
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Digestion
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Gastrointestinal system
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8539
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
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application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xix, 195 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Fatemah M. Alhasawi
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3D221TF
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Alhasawi
GivenName
Fatemah M.
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2017-11-20 10:50:38
AssociatedEntity
Name
FATEMAH ALHASAWI
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
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License
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-01-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2018-08-02
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after August 2nd, 2018.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2017-11-20T15:46:42
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-11-20T15:46:42
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