Staff View
Exploration of the effects of perfectionism on disturbed eating behaviors among Asian-American college students

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Exploration of the effects of perfectionism on disturbed eating behaviors among Asian-American college students
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Chen
NamePart (type = given)
Qing
NamePart (type = date)
1991-
DisplayForm
Qing Chen
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Worobey
NamePart (type = given)
John
DisplayForm
John Worobey
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bryd-Bredbenner
NamePart (type = given)
Carol
DisplayForm
Carol Bryd-Bredbenner
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Quick
NamePart (type = given)
Virginia
DisplayForm
Virginia Quick
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2018
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2018-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
With a burgeoning increase in the incidence and prevalence of eating disorders, studies of disturbed eating behaviors have drawn extensive attention in the past decades. Although contributing factors are not fully understood, ample and robust evidence exists indicating a positive relationship between disturbed eating behaviors and perfectionism. However, although perfectionism is widely studied as a multidimensional construct, research regarding the relation of subdimensions of perfectionism to disturbed eating is still sorely needed. Another pivotal element to take into consideration in this line of research is acculturation, yet even less has been done in terms of examining the effects of acculturation on this interplay. The present study was designed as an attempt to shed light on these issues among an Asian-American college students sample. There were three major objectives of this cross-sectional study: 1) to confirm the positive association between perfectionism and disturbed eating behaviors among Asian-American college students; 2) to examine the interactions between subdimensions of perfectionism and disturbed eating behaviors among Asian-American college students; and 3) to explore the influence of acculturation on the interplays between perfectionism and disturbed eating behaviors among Asian-American college students. Drawing on data from 172 Asian-American college students, results of regression analysis confirmed that perfectionism is a strong predictor of disturbed eating behaviors. It was also found that the relationship of disturbed eating behaviors to maladaptive aspects of perfectionism was positively significant (p<0.05), except for adaptive aspects of perfectionism. However, this study did not reveal any significant influence of acculturation on either perfectionism or disturbed eating. In addition, we also detected a positive correlation between BMI and disturbed eating in the manner expected. To summarize, targeting pathological perfectionism could be a promising avenue by which the education on disturbed eating behaviors or even treatment outcomes of eating disorders are maximized. Although results were not significant, a possible buffering effect of acculturation on the association between perfectionism and disturbed eating was suggested by the present study, and it may also imply a general heightened risk of having disturbed eating behaviors among Asian-American college students. It is recommended that future research should be conducted in larger Asian-American community samples to further understand the role of acculturation in maladaptive personal traits and disturbed eating behaviors.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Nutritional Sciences
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Asian American students
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Eating disorders
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8628
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 78 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Qing Chen
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T37D2ZB7
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Chen
GivenName
Qing
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-01-08 18:23:38
AssociatedEntity
Name
QING CHEN
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-01-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2019-01-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after January 31st, 2019.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
CreatingApplication
Version
1.4
ApplicationName
Mac OS X 10.13.2 Quartz PDFContext
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-01-08T23:09:10
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-01-08T23:09:10
Back to the top
Version 8.5.3
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2024