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Understanding the self-assembly of lignin-based biomaterials

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TitleInfo
Title
Understanding the self-assembly of lignin-based biomaterials
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Al-shahrani
NamePart (type = given)
Dalia
NamePart (type = date)
1990-
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Dalia Al-shahrani
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Salas-de la Cruz
NamePart (type = given)
David
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David Salas-de la Cruz
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zhu
NamePart (type = given)
Hao
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Hao Zhu
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fu
NamePart (type = given)
Jinglin
DisplayForm
Jinglin Fu
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Camden Graduate School
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2018
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2018-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Developing bio-renewable raw materials for manufacturing and technology has become a focus of research, with special interest in the field of biomaterials. Lignocellulosic biomass can be utilized as a raw material to produce chemicals and it is an important feedstock for renewable fuels in the production of energy. Lignocellulose is composed of mainly three biomacromolecules (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin). Currently, most of the extracted lignin is either decanted in nearby waters or burned in energy-recovery systems. The reason why lignin is disposed of instead of being further processed is that lignin is immiscible with most polymers and its association behavior is still unknown due to its non-uniform aromatic structure with a number of methoxy, ether and ester groups. To fully utilize lignin, an improved understanding of the interfacial adhesion and interfacial tension is needed. The main motivation for this project is to find new possible ways to make lignin, a lignocellulose component, miscible with most polymers, and to understand how the molecule associates and behaves in the presence of other natural macromolecules. One of the main barriers to utilization of lignin is the absence of significant intermolecular interactions, which cause miscibility problems resulting in phase separation, a generally undesirable characteristic for manufacturing applications, especially in the production of materials. Lignin-based polymeric blends in solution have provided a possible avenue for understanding lignin’s self-assembly behavior in solid and the variations in morphology, physical and thermal properties that come with the addition of secondary and tertiary components, and as well as foreign molecules such reduced graphene oxide (rGO). In the first study, we focused on understanding the association behavior using high and low proportions of cellulose to test how the various functional groups may interact differentially with lignin utilizing ionic liquids as the solvent and water as the coagulation agent. A tertiary component, rGO, was introduced into the lignin-based biocomposite to modify π-π aggregations. The study looks at the effect of rGO as a function material concentration. The biocomposites were investigated using Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) techniques. Results show that π-π aggregates are driven by the π-π interaction of the aromatic groups in lignin. The π-π aggregates undergo disaggregation by the addition of rGO on the blended biocomposite. The results showed that increasing the cellulose content in the cellulose-lignin biocomposite can increase the molecular interactions, causing an increase in the stability of the blended film and an increase in the crystallinity of the cellulose. Profound changes in the morphology was observed upon the addition of rGO. Results demonstrates that the addition of rGO into the biocomposite prevented the self-assembly of lignin. The second study investigated the material morphological and thermal effects upon the addition of rGO as a function of material composition in a tertiary system comprised of lignin, cellulose, and xylan. The results demonstrated that the regenerated films’ structural, morphological and thermal character changed as a function of lignin-xylan concentration and upon the addition of rGO. We observed how the fibrous/spherical structure changed as results of the addition of rGO into the system. We provided evidence that shows a dramatic change in the glass transition temperature and degradation temperature. The two studies provided evidence to suggest that the addition of rGO prevented the self-assembly of lignin by reducing π-π aggregations and reducing the cellulose percent crystallinity. In addition, it suggested that by increasing interfacial adhesion while mitigating interfacial tension increase the utility of lignin. The increase in the interfacial adhesion between the lignin backbone hydroxyl groups and the matrix with its abundant hydroxyl and ether functional groups which are available for hydrogen bonding, impacts it’s the suitability and, consequently, the its utilization as a value-added biomaterial.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Chemistry
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8947
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (x, 60 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Lignin
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Dalia Al-Shahrani
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Camden Graduate School Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10005600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T31G0QM0
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Al-shahrani
GivenName
Dalia
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-04-25 14:16:55
AssociatedEntity
Name
Dalia Al-shahrani
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Camden Graduate School
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2018-05-02T16:34:14
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2018-05-02T16:34:14
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