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The goddess on parade

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TitleInfo
Title
The goddess on parade
SubTitle
mobile cult statues in archaic and classical Greece
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Beck-Schachter
NamePart (type = given)
Aaron
NamePart (type = date)
1978-
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Aaron Beck-Schachter
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author
Name (type = personal)
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Power
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Timothy
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Timothy Power
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Figueira
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Thomas
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Thomas Figueira
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Advisory Committee
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co-chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Allen-Hornblower
NamePart (type = given)
Emily
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Emily Allen-Hornblower
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Shapiro
NamePart (type = given)
Alan
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Alan Shapiro
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Advisory Committee
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outside member
Name (type = corporate)
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Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
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School of Graduate Studies
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school
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Text
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theses
OriginInfo
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2018
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2018-05
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2018
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation investigates mobile cult statues and their reflection in Euripides’ Iphigeneia among the Taurians and the Helen. Chapter One deals with the physical evidence for small, mobile cult images: their traditional settings, contexts, and histories of exchange and movement. Chapter Two is a survey of the literary terms used to refer to cult images. The first part of chapter Three treats the evidence for “arriving” cult images in ritual festivals and processions. Using the Athenian tradition of the theft of the Palladion as a case study, the second part of the chapter analyzes the different ways a community could characterize this “original arrival.” Chapter Four presents an analysis of the different modalities of exchange which characterized the movement of cult statues. These images were objects manipulated by humans, and thus all possible activities associated with possessions (theft, exchange, permanent loss, or freely given gift) were capable of influencing their use. Chapter Five analyzes how these human situations influenced Euripides’ IT and the Helen. I argue that in the IT, Iphigenia, just like the “Bears” of the Arkteia, is dedication herself. As priestess of Artemis, she is a gift given to the goddess, and her movement reflects the traditional sequence of a dedicatory journey: travel, gift, and return. When Orestes steals her back from the Taurians his action reflects the traditional concerns surrounding a stolen cult object: the rights and comportment of marginalized strata of society. On the other hand, in the Helen, the existence of the ghostly eidôlon removes all authority and “truth” from the representation and locates it in Helen herself. The effect of this relocation results in a focus not on the dramatization of the exchange of cult images as in the IT (that is, dedication or theft), but on the “truth” of representation itself. This critique culminates in the escape of Menelaus and Helen from Egypt under cover of a false burial ceremony where the active participants are not dead but alive. The historical burial of Spartan kings involved – in certain circumstances – the use of processed images of the dead called eidôla. I argue that Menelaus’ status as a figure outside the Agiad and Eurypontid sphere of authority combined with the emphasis on the living authority of Helen implies a critique of the use of representation to create authority in Sparta.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Classics
RelatedItem (type = host)
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8833
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (vi, 268 p.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Religion
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Greece--History
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Aaron Beck-Schachter
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3W66Q6W
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Beck-Schachter
GivenName
Aaron
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Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-04-11 12:38:53
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Name
Aaron Beck-Schachter
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
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License
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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2018-04-12T16:05:20
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