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Range contraction enables harvesting to extinction

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo
Title
Range contraction enables harvesting to extinction
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Burgess
NamePart (type = given)
Matthew G.
Affiliation
Sustainable Fisheries Group; Bren School of Environmental Science and Management; Marine Science Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA; Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Costello
NamePart (type = given)
Christopher
Affiliation
Sustainable Fisheries Group; Bren School of Environmental Science and Management; Marine Science Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fredston-Hermann
NamePart (type = given)
Alexa
Affiliation
Bren School of Environmental Science and Management
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pinsky
NamePart (type = given)
Malin L.
Affiliation
Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources, Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gaines
NamePart (type = given)
Steven D.
Affiliation
Sustainable Fisheries Group; Bren School of Environmental Science and Management; Marine Science Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Tilman
NamePart (type = given)
David
Affiliation
Bren School of Environmental Science and Management; Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Polasky
NamePart (type = given)
Stephen
Affiliation
Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA; Department of Applied Economics, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
Name (type = corporate); (authority = RutgersOrg-Department)
NamePart
Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources
Name (type = corporate); (authority = RutgersOrg-School)
NamePart
School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (SEBS)
Genre (authority = RULIB-FS)
Article, Refereed
Genre (authority = NISO JAV)
Version of Record (VoR)
Note (type = peerReview)
Peer reviewed
OriginInfo
DateIssued (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes)
2017
Abstract (type = Abstract)
Economic incentives to harvest a species usually diminish as its abundance declines, because harvest costs increase. This prevents harvesting to extinction. A known exception can occur if consumer demand causes a declining species’ harvest price to rise faster than costs. This threat may affect rare and valuable species, such as large land mammals, sturgeons, and bluefin tunas. We analyze a similar but underappreciated threat, which arises when the geographic area (range) occupied by a species contracts as its abundance declines. Range contractions maintain the local densities of declining populations, which facilitates harvesting to extinction by preventing abundance declines from causing harvest costs to rise. Factors causing such range contractions include schooling, herding, or flocking behaviors–which, ironically, can be predator-avoidance adaptations; patchy environments; habitat loss; and climate change. We use a simple model to identify combinations of range contractions and price increases capable of causing extinction from profitable overharvesting, and we compare these to an empirical review. We find that some aquatic species that school or forage in patchy environments experience sufficiently severe range contractions as they decline to allow profitable harvesting to extinction even with little or no price increase; and some high-value declining aquatic species experience severe price increases. For terrestrial species, the data needed to evaluate our theory are scarce, but available evidence suggests that extinction-enabling range contractions may be common among declining mammals and birds. Thus, factors causing range contraction as abundance declines may pose unexpectedly large extinction risks to harvested species.
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
PhysicalDescription
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
Extent
25 pages
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Anthropogenic Allee Effect
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Hyperstable
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Endangered species
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Poaching
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Citation
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf)
2017
AssociatedObject
Name
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Type
Journal
Relationship
Has part
Detail
3945-3950
Identifier (type = volume and issue)
114(15)
Reference (type = url)
https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1607551114
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Pinsky, Malin L.
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30149900001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T37084V5
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = FS); (TYPE = [FS] statement #1); (ID = rulibRdec0004)
Copyright for scholarly resources published in RUcore is retained by the copyright holder. By virtue of its appearance in this open access medium, you are free to use this resource, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings. Other uses, such as reproduction or republication, may require the permission of the copyright holder.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Multiple author license v. 1
Detail
I hereby grant to Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (Rutgers) the non-exclusive right to retain, reproduce, and distribute the deposited work (Work) in whole or in part, in and from its electronic format, without fee. This agreement does not represent a transfer of copyright to Rutgers.Rutgers may make and keep more than one copy of the Work for purposes of security, backup, preservation, and access and may migrate the Work to any medium or format for the purpose of preservation and access in the future. Rutgers will not make any alteration, other than as allowed by this agreement, to the Work.I represent and warrant to Rutgers that the Work is my original work. I also represent that the Work does not, to the best of my knowledge, infringe or violate any rights of others.I further represent and warrant that I have obtained all necessary rights to permit Rutgers to reproduce and distribute the Work and that any third-party owned content is clearly identified and acknowledged within the Work.By granting this license, I acknowledge that I have read and agreed to the terms of this agreement and all related RUcore and Rutgers policies.
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
Document
CreatingApplication
Version
1.5
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-03-31T07:15:28
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-03-31T07:15:28
ApplicationName
pdfTeX-1.40.17
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