Staff View
Piezoelectric energy harvesting from roadway

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Piezoelectric energy harvesting from roadway
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Jasim
NamePart (type = given)
Abbas Fadhil
NamePart (type = date)
1980-
DisplayForm
Abbas Fadhil Jasim
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
WANG
NamePart (type = given)
HAO
DisplayForm
HAO WANG
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2018
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2018-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Energy harvesting technologies have attracted much attention as an alternative power source of roadway accessories in different scales. Piezoelectric materials, which have been widely used in sensor technologies due to their cost-effectiveness, are capable of producing electrical energy from mechanical energy. Therefore, piezoelectric transducers can be designed to harvest the wasted mechanical energy generated under wheel loading that can be stored in an electronic capacitor or integrated with sensors for in-situ road condition monitoring. This dissertation aims to develop a novel design of a piezoelectric transducer with optimized geometry for energy harvesting under vehicular loading in the roadway. The novel Bridge transducer with layered poling is designed to increase the piezoelectric coefficient and the relative dielectric permittivity, which produces much higher energy than traditional transducers. Finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to predict the generated energy output and the resulted mechanical stress in the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducer. The results of the optimization analysis indicate that the optimized geometry parameters can generate the maximum energy output within the stress failure criteria. Later, an energy harvester module that contains multiple stacked transducers, 64 novel transducers, was fabricated and tested under single pulse and cyclic loading events. The main objectives of this part were to evaluate the energy output and fatigue behavior of the piezoelectric energy harvester using laboratory testing and numerical simulation. The analysis results showed that two different material failure models need to be considered in relation to mechanical failure of the Bridge transducer, namely tensile and shear failure. This emphasizes that the optimum design of energy module should consider the balance of energy output and fatigue life that are affected by the fabrication of a single Bridge transducer and the packaging design of the energy module. To take into account the nature of the energy harvester-pavement interaction and to achieve better computation efficiency, the effect of this interaction on pavement responses was studied using a decoupled approach. First, a 3D pavement model was built, and then the pavement responses under the tire contact stresses were calculated. The effects of energy harvester-pavement interaction at different locations, horizontally and vertically, were also analyzed. The results show that the maximum power output of the energy harvester module is around 122mW at a vehicle speed of 65mph and 3 inches embedded depth. Furthermore, embedding the energy harvesting module below 3 inches from the pavement surface is the best location to maximize both power output and service life. Finally, to reveal the potentials of some important technologies for harvesting energy from a pavement network, a case study is discussed, which uses the New Jersey roadway network as the example for analysis. The potential of electrical energy generation for thermoelectric and piezoelectric (cymbal and novel bridge design) technologies were considered. Based on available energy harvesting technologies, a thermoelectric-based pipe system covering the entire New Jersey roadway network may potentially collect 20.11 GWh electrical energy per day, while a piezoelectric transducer system may collect around 3.74 and 10.01MWh of electrical energy per day for cymbal and novel bridge transducer designs, respectively.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Piezoelectricity
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Energy harvesting
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_8793
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xix, 196 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Abbas Fadhil Jasim
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T36T0R44
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Jasim
GivenName
Abbas
MiddleName
Fadhil
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = start); (qualifier = exact)
2018-04-10 16:22:17
AssociatedEntity
Name
Abbas Jasim
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = start); (qualifier = exact)
2020-05-22
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = end); (qualifier = exact)
2021-05-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 31, 2021.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
CreatingApplication
Version
1.5
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-04-11T16:51:11
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-04-11T16:53:00
ApplicationName
Adobe PDF Library 15.0
Back to the top
Version 8.5.3
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2024