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Bee foraging choice and implications for plant coexistence

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TitleInfo
Title
Bee foraging choice and implications for plant coexistence
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Socolar
NamePart (type = given)
Elizabeth
NamePart (type = date)
1988-
DisplayForm
Elizabeth Socolar
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author
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NamePart (type = family)
Winfree
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Rachael
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Rachael Winfree
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Lockwood
NamePart (type = given)
Julie
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Julie Lockwood
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Pinsky
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Malin
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Malin Pinsky
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Crone
NamePart (type = given)
Elizabeth
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Elizabeth Crone
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Advisory Committee
Role
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outside member
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Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
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School of Graduate Studies
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school
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Text
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theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2018
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2018-05
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2018
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Species interactions are essential to our understanding of community ecology, particularly when we think about how species persist in communities. Compared to competition and predation, the effect of mutualism on the population dynamics and coexistence of species is less well studied. Interactions between plants and pollinators are a model system for studying mutualism. In these interactions, both of the partner species benefit: the bee receives food, and the plant is able to reproduce because the bee moves its gametes to other plants of the same species. This sounds straightforward, but two points make this more complicated. First, most pollen is deposited within just a few flower visits of where it was picked up. From the perspective of the plant, then, successful reproduction hinges on the foraging choices of bees, particularly the sequences in which they visit plants. A second point complicating the plant-pollinator relationship is that many foraging pollinators have a tendency to preferentially visit whichever plant species is most common in a community. If pollinator visits are proportional to plant abundance, then we might expect that sequential visits would be proportional to the square of plant abundance and so it should be really difficult for rare plants to reproduce. In pollen-limited plant communities, the foraging behavior of pollinators might mediate coexistence and competitive exclusion by determining which plants receive conspecific pollen. A key question is whether realistic pollinator foraging behavior promotes coexistence or exclusion. My first two thesis chapters quantify realistic pollinator foraging behavior in response to relative abundances of flowering species, and the spatial arrangement of flowering plants. In my third chapter, I use a simulation model to understand how pollinator foraging behavior impacts the coexistence dynamics of pollen-limited plants. To determine whether pollinators are likely to provide a biologically important coexistence mechanism in nature, I compare my results to bee foraging data from the literature and from a novel experimental analysis.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Ecology and Evolution
RelatedItem (type = host)
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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ETD_8859
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (vii, 106 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Bees--Ecology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Pollination by bees
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Elizabeth Anne Bruninga Socolar
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TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T30P13GW
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Socolar
GivenName
Elizabeth
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-04-11 23:02:15
AssociatedEntity
Name
Elizabeth Socolar
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2018-04-11T22:56:15
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2018-04-11T22:56:15
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