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Shape evolution mechanism and characterization of two-dimensional MoS2 and NbS2

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Title
Shape evolution mechanism and characterization of two-dimensional MoS<sub>2</sub> and NbS<sub>2</sub>
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bozkurt
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Ibrahim H.
NamePart (type = date)
1986-
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Ibrahim H. Bozkurt
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author
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Chhowalla
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Manish
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Manish Chhowalla
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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KLEIN
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LISA C
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LISA C KLEIN
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Birnie
NamePart (type = given)
Dunbar P.
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Dunbar P. Birnie
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Garfunkel
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Eric L
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Eric L Garfunkel
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Advisory Committee
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outside member
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Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
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School of Graduate Studies
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school
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Text
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theses
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2018-10
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2018
Place
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xx
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2018
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Two dimensional (2D) semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have attracted much attention due to their unique physical and chemical properties. Increased interest in the research of 2D layered materials began in 2004 when graphene, a monolayer of graphite, was discovered. TMDs are a class of layered materials which consist of over 40 members ranging from semiconductors to insulator to metals. There are three polytypes crystal structure of TMDs (1T, 2H, and 3R), which represent trigonal, hexagonal and rhombohedral, respectively. TMDs can be synthesized by one of two different approaches, top-down and bottom-up. Top-down includes mechanical and chemical exfoliation, while bottom-up includes physical and chemical vapor deposition. Synthesizing these atomically thin materials enables a new set of properties due to the quantum confinement effects.
MoS2 and NbS2 are two significant members of the TMD family and are the main topic of work in this thesis. These two materials were successfully synthesized with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) by controlling their growth parameters, each of which has a great influence on nucleation and the growth mechanism. Their shape evolution mechanism provides important insight into their nucleation and growth mechanism. The MoS2 part of this work was dedicated to understand this mechanism and how to apply it to other TMDs. To do that, MoS2 was synthesized on different substrates to explore the optimum surface chemistry between the substrate atoms and reactants. On the other hand, Niobium disulfide (NbS2) has received less attention compared to other TMDS due to its unexplored properties. Therefore, analyzing growth parameters and the potential applications of NbS2 was also another aim of this thesis.
In the NbS2 part of this thesis, two different approaches were pursued growing NbS2 flakes. The first approach used sulfur and Nb2O5 powders as the precursors. The second approach used an alkali promoter, Nb2O5, and sulfur. The alkali-assisted approach yielded high-quality growth of few-layered NbS2 with thicknesses ranging from 2 – 10 nm and lateral dimensions in the hundreds of micrometers. Our Raman and transmission electron microscopy analyses suggested that the as-grown material is a mixture of 2H and 3R phases. It was found that there was a substantial amount of incorporated potassium ions from the growth process in the NbS2 samples, which leads to doping and metallic behavior. In the absence of alkali growth promoters, the lateral dimensions of the crystals are smaller, but they displayed metallic behavior. The electrical and HER properties of NbS2 exhibited a promising result for future studies. The realization of thin and metallic TMDs is crucial for studying potential integration into electronics and catalysis.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Materials Science and Engineering
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Molybdenum disulfide
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Niobium—Isotopes
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
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ETD_9191
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doi:10.7282/T3PR80M0
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electronic resource
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xvi, 145 pages : illustrations)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Ibrahim H. Bozkurt
Location
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NjNbRU
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Bozkurt
GivenName
Ibrahim H.
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-09-13 16:51:31
AssociatedEntity
Name
Ibrahim H. Bozkurt
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Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Type
Embargo
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2018-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2020-10-30
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 30th, 2020.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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