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Minority stress and eating behavior among overweight and obese sexual minority women

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TitleInfo
Title
Minority stress and eating behavior among overweight and obese sexual minority women
SubTitle
an ecological momentary assessment study
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Panza
NamePart (type = given)
Emily
NamePart (type = date)
1988-
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Emily Panza
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author
Name (type = personal)
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Selby
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Edward A
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Edward A Selby
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Leventhal
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Howard
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Howard Leventhal
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Advisory Committee
Role
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Leyro
NamePart (type = given)
Teresa
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Teresa Leyro
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pantalone
NamePart (type = given)
David
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David Pantalone
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2018
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2018-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2018
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Background: Sexual minority women are nearly three times more likely to be overweight or obese than their heterosexual counterparts, yet little research has investigated why or how sexual minority status confers risk for obesity in women (Boehmer, Bowen & Bauer, 2007). The current study examined the relevance of one factor, minority stress, as a mechanism for weight disparity in this group. Sexual minority women belong to multiple socially stigmatized groups: being non-heterosexual, being female, and for 60% of this group, being overweight. This “triple oppression” exposes sexual minority women to unique and chronic minority stressors, including repeated experiences of external stigmatization (i.e., being treated unfairly or differently) and internal stigmatization (i.e., internalized shame and hostility) (Meyer, 2003). Social rejection is stressful, causing chronic elevations in stress and negative emotion that some sexual minority women may try to regulate by overeating and/or binge eating. Over time, these behaviors may promote weight gain and risk for obesity, resulting in a positive feedback loop of stigmatization, stress, overeating, and weight gain.
Methods: To test this proposed theoretical model, the current study used Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) methods to examine whether lifetime and acute minority stress increased risk for elevated levels of stress, negative emotion, overeating, and binge eating in sexual minority women. 55 overweight or obese (BMI>25) sexual minority (e.g.,lesbian, bisexual, queer, pansexual) women were recruited from the local community to complete baseline assessments of eating behavior and minority stress related to sexual orientation, weight, and gender. For the following five days, participants used a smartphone application to report experiences of perceived stigmatization, overeating, binge eating, stress, and negative emotion five times daily.
Results: Study findings reveal promising support for the proposed model. As expected, women who reported greater lifetime heterosexist, gender-based, and weight-based stigma reported higher baseline levels of stress, depression, disordered eating symptoms, and binge eating symptoms, and greater daily stress and negative emotion during the EMA period. Stigma events reported during the EMA period were associated with greater concurrent negative emotion and overeating at the same signal, and being stigmatized on any given day was associated with more stress, negative emotion, overeating, and binge eating on that day.
Conclusions: The current study provides preliminary support for minority stress as a potential mechanism of the obesity disparity among sexual minority women. Given the paucity of research in this area and this study’s small and preliminary nature, findings justify future research studies to unpack the relevance and significance of minority stress as a risk factor for obesity among sexual minority women using longer monitoring periods and larger, more diverse samples. This research will be essential for developing effective, informed, and tailored interventions to reduce obesity, to increase knowledge and resources for coping, and to improve health among sexual minority women.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Obesity in women
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Sexual minority women
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_9056
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (95 pages : illustrations)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Emily Panza
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-2nh7-x127
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Panza
GivenName
Emily
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-06-03 14:31:21
AssociatedEntity
Name
Emily Panza
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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windows xp
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DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-06-04T22:33:26
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-06-04T22:33:26
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