Staff View
Black like me : understanding racial identity development through the experiences of black women in white sororities at predominantly white institutions (PWIs)

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Black like me : understanding racial identity development through the experiences of black women in white sororities at predominantly white institutions (PWIs)
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Smith
NamePart (type = given)
Joy L.
DisplayForm
Joy L. Smith
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Giarelli
NamePart (type = given)
James
DisplayForm
James Giarelli
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bonner II
NamePart (type = given)
Fred A
DisplayForm
Fred A Bonner II
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Rubin
NamePart (type = given)
Beth C.
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Beth C. Rubin
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Education
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2018
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2018-05
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2018
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Du Bois (1902) argues that “being Black” is a consistent identity struggle for people of African descent in the United States because Black identity is often seen as incongruent with the cultural and social values of mainstream America. Tinto (1993) offers that this incongruence is apparent at predominantly White institutions (PWIs) and suggests that participating in racially-centered student organizations allows Black students to “fit in” at PWIs and, in turn, promotes their success in college. Carter (1994) contends that Black identity is not a uniformed experience; socioeconomic status, educational level/attainment and ethnicity/nationality diversify it. This dissertation explored this versatility through the stories of Black women who joined White sororities at PWIs. The goal was to shed light on their experiences, to understand how race is perceived and understood in the lives of those who do not perform race in traditional or stereotypical ways. Secondly, the research delved into the intersected relationship between race, class/socioeconomics and ethnicity/nationality—and the role that it plays in defining Black identity at PWIs.

The study employed a phenomenological approach and focused on the participants’ experiences as pre-college and undergraduate students. Individual interviews, a focus group and ethnographic observations were used to collect the data. It also examined the role that race played in their decision to join a White sorority, as well as their experiences with their racial peers on campus—as first-year students and, later, as members of their sororities. The findings revealed that socioeconomic status and ethnicity/nationality played critical roles in their understandings of Black identity; most of the participants were ridiculed for “acting White” by both, their Black and White peers. Secondly, the participants felt that the authenticity of their “Blackness” was questioned by their racial peers because they did not engage with the Black community on campus on a regular basis. Third, their interactions with the Black/African American students on campus largely impacted their decisions to join traditional (White) sororities; their experiences with their racial peers on campus were nearly identical. Finally, the participants were celebrated their identity as Black women; they simply did not participate in their campus’ “racially authenticating” activities.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Social and Philosophical Foundations of Education
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Greek letter societies
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
African American college students
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Blacks--Race identity
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Education Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001500001
Identifier
ETD_9033
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-x4hn-8c16
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (159 pages) : illustrations
Note (type = degree)
Ed.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Joy L. Smith
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Smith
GivenName
Joy
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-05-08 18:37:39
AssociatedEntity
Name
Joy Smith
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Education
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
CreatingApplication
Version
1.5
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-05-11T14:48:17
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-05-11T14:48:17
ApplicationName
Microsoft® Word 2013
Back to the top
Version 8.5.3
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2024