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Hillclimbing in a hierarchy of abstraction spaces

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LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
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technical report
PhysicalDescription
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application/pdf
Extent
1 online resource (13 pages)
Note (type = special display note)
Technical report LCSR-TR-198
Name (type = corporate); (authority = RutgersOrg-School)
NamePart
School of Arts and Sciences (SAS) (New Brunswick)
Name (type = corporate); (authority = RutgersOrg-Department)
NamePart
Computer Science (New Brunswick)
TypeOfResource
Text
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ellman
NamePart (type = given)
Thomas
Affiliation
Computer Science (New Brunswick)
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Patra
NamePart (type = given)
Saibal
Affiliation
Computer Science (New Brunswick)
Role
RoleTerm (type = text); (authority = marcrt)
author
TitleInfo
Title
Hillclimbing in a hierarchy of abstraction spaces
Abstract (type = abstract)
Hillclimbing search has been shown to be useful for solving constraint satisfaction problems that are too large to be attacked using backtracking search. Nevertheless, hillclimbing search can be computationally expensive when the length of each climb is long, or when many climbs are required due to the presence of local, but non-global optima. ``Hierarchic Hillclimbing'' (HHC) is an extension of ordinary ``Flat Hillclimbing'' that is designed to attack such difficulties. HHC carries out hillclimbing search in a hierarchy of abstraction spaces, starting with the most abstract and proceeding to the most concrete. HHC takes as input a description of the abstraction hierarchy, as well as an evaluation function for each abstraction level. The HHC algorithm has been implemented along with a program to synthesize the required abstraction hierarchies and evaluation functions. The synthesis program and the HHC algorithm have been tested in the domains of uniprocessor scheduling and two dimensional tile packing. Results show HHC to improve in two ways on ordinary hillclimbing without abstraction: HHC requires less computation time to complete a single climb. In addition, when the abstraction hierarchy is chosen with care HHC is more likely to find a solution on a single climb.
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (keyDate = yes)
1994-02
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Computer Science (New Brunswick)
Identifier (type = local)
rucore21032500001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-0rht-zs14
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This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights.You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use.For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).
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Copyright protected
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Open
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Permission or license
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Technical

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Document
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1.4
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GPL Ghostscript 9.07
DateCreated (point = start); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-06-06T12:36:41
DateCreated (point = start); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2018-06-06T12:36:41
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