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Accumbens processing of a food associated cue in a rat model of binge eating

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Title
Accumbens processing of a food associated cue in a rat model of binge eating
Name (type = personal)
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Stamos
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Joshua
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1984-
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Joshua Stamos
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author
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West
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Mark
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Mark West
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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John
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John Pintar
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Bello
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Nick
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Nick Bello
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Advisory Committee
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Kusnecov
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Alexander
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Alexander Kusnecov
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Zhiping
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Zhiping Pang
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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kuzhikandathil
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Eldo
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Eldo kuzhikandathil
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Advisory Committee
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outside member
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Rutgers University
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degree grantor
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School of Graduate Studies
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school
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Text
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theses
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DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019
DateOther (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2019-01
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2019
Place
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Binge Eating Disorder (BED) is characterized by repeated episodes of loss of control over eating, negative self-image, and feelings of diminished self-worth (APA, 2013). BED is the most common of all eating disorders and effects between 0.6 and 7 percent of the general population (Marzilli, Cerniglia, & Cimino, 2018; Kim et al , 2018; Dahlgren, Wisting, & Ro, 2017). It has been shown that binging eating (BE) behavior, a key component of BED, can lead to acute elevations in synaptic dopamine levels in Nucleus Acumbens (Nac) similar to what may observed as a result of drugs of abuse such as cocaine or amphetamine (Rada, Avena, Hoebel, 2005; Unberg, Shader, Hsu, & Greenblatt, 2012; Wang et al, 2011). It is possible that the act of binging may lead to addition like effects in a similar way to what is observed in drug abusers. It has long been believed that reward cues play an important role in addiction. In this study we examine the effects of a history of BE on cue processing. Female Sprague Dawlay rats were subjected to a six week BE pretreatment. Following which these rats were tested in a 10 day pavlovian experiment where a tone cue signaled availability of a sucrose reward. Single unit recordings were taken in both Nac Core and Shell during the experiment. Additionally, we recorded ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) during the experiment in order to gain a measure of the subjects affect. BE rats exhibited significant decreases in number of cued head entries when compared to a control group. Additionally, analysis of neural firing during the pavlovian task indicated decreased Nac Core processing of the reward associated cue in BE animals. Analysis of firing during consumption indicated increased processing during consumption when compared to a motor matched control behavior. This result held for both BE and control rats and in both Nac Core and Shell. Finally, Linear trend analysis of USVs indicated a decrease in positive affect in the BE group. Taken together these results indicate that BE treatment results in decreased tone processing in Nac Core, and possible decreases in positive affect. Finally, our results indicate that Nac processing increases during consumption when compared to a control behavior and that this result was unaffected by BE treatment.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Neuroscience
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Compulsive eating
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD_9493
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electronic resource
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (103 pages : illustrations)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Joshua Stamos
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Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-8dfn-zv83
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Stamos
GivenName
Joshua
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-01-06 16:57:21
AssociatedEntity
Name
Joshua Stamos
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Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
AssociatedObject
Type
License
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-01-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2021-01-30
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after January 30th, 2021.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2019-02-27T11:31:10
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