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Corrosion behavior of reinforced concrete bridge decks under laboratory and field conditions

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TitleInfo
Title
Corrosion behavior of reinforced concrete bridge decks under laboratory and field conditions
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Al-Nawadi
NamePart (type = given)
Hasan
NamePart (type = date)
1981-
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Hasan Al-Nawadi
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author
Name (type = personal)
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Nassif
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Hani H
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Hani H Nassif
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Najm
NamePart (type = given)
Husam
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Husam Najm
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Advisory Committee
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Wang
NamePart (type = given)
Haw
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Haw Wang
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Coit
NamePart (type = given)
David
DisplayForm
David Coit
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
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Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2019
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2019-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2019
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Reinforced concrete is one of the most efficient building materials widely used across the world, however, corrosion of its embedded steel reinforcement is the most aggressive rival to its durability. Corrosion becomes more aggressive in the presence of cracks, which makes the ingress of chloride ions from deicing salts into concrete bridge decks more critical, leading to an annual cost of about 8.3 billion for mitigation and rehabilitation of bridge decks in the United States of America.
The research consists of two components: laboratory testing and field monitoring. The laboratory testing is aimed at evaluating the effects of cracks and crack sealants in concrete specimens on the corrosion process using ASTM G109, and correlation of bridge deck service life and long-term predictions with field performance. The laboratory-based experimental program includes the use of various small-scale specimens as well as deck slabs to study the effect of various parameters such as crack width and depth as well as the efficiency of the crack sealants. Five types of steel reinforcement (Black, Duplex stainless, Galvanized, MMFX, and Epoxy-Coated), two types of concrete classes (class A and HPC), and two Sodium chloride concentrations (3% and 15%) were used. Additionally, four crack patterns, two different crack sealants, and two types of sensors (2000 silver-silver chloride electrode and multi element probes MEPs) were also used. On the other hand, the field work used corrosion sensors for 20 years to maintain the structural health monitoring (SHM) and data collection of two existing bridges, GSP 84.1 and 159.7.

After three years of exposure to diluted as well as severe sodium chloride solutions, laboratory results show that concrete specimens with Duplex Stainless and MMFX steel rebars had an excellent corrosion resistance in comparison with Epoxy-coated rebars. Moreover, the crack depth has more influence than the crack width for all specimens. When the cracks are sealed using the T-70 MX crack sealant, it showed a remarkable efficiency in comparison with Seal Krete sealant. Additionally, results from the field monitoring of the two bridge decks show that Galvanized Steel rebars underwent noticeable corrosion activity in comparison with the Stainless Steel deck. Moreover, data collected from laboratory tests and field performance is used to validate results from simulation model to correlate service life predictions from accelerated laboratory-based tests.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Reinforced concrete -- Corrosion
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Concrete bridges -- Design and construction
RelatedItem (type = host)
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
Identifier
ETD_9526
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electronic resource
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (221 pages : illustrations)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Hasan Al-Nawadi
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-x7v3-h165
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Al-Nawadi
GivenName
Hasan
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-01-11 00:53:34
AssociatedEntity
Name
Hasan Al-Nawadi
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2019-01-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2021-01-30
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after January 30th, 2021.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2019-01-13T22:31:38
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2019-01-13T22:31:38
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