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Epitaxial growth of topological materials

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Title
Epitaxial growth of topological materials
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Bansal
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Namrata
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1983-
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Namrata Bansal
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author
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Oh
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Seongshik
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Seongshik Oh
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Cheong
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Sangwook
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Sangwook Cheong
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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McAfee
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Sigrid McAfee
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Advisory Committee
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Wu
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Weida
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Weida Wu
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Advisory Committee
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outside member
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Rutgers University
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degree grantor
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School of Graduate Studies
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Text
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theses
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2019
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2019-01
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2019
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xx
Language
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eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Recently, in 2007, a new electronic phase was discovered – termed as Topological Insulator (TI) – a bulk insulator that has conducting states bound to its surface. An apt analogy would be a ceramic block coated with a nanometer thick layer of metallic paint, so that electrical conduction occurs only on the surface, except in this case, the material is the same throughout. The understanding of topological insulators is based on the previously thought to be complete band theory, but taking into account the topological effects. The term topological implies the presence of certain bulk invariants that help differentiate between different systems having the same symmetry. The work presented here concerns the understanding of the transport properties of these electronic states that emerge only on the surfaces of this very special class of materials.

The spin of electrons in the heavy metals of the TIs is linked to their intrinsic angular momentum; this spin-orbit coupling (SOC) leads to twisting of the electronic states in certain regions of momentum space, establishing a topological order. The term topology comes from mathematics, and deals with quantities remaining invariant under continuous modifications – it is the topology of the electronic band structures originating from SOC that protects these metallic surface states against disorders. The SOC also coerces the motion of spin-up electrons in one direction and spin-down electrons in the other – a distinguishing feature that forbids complete backscattering and localization i.e. the electrons can move freely with little or no resistance in their preferred direction. This ‘spin-momentum locking’ makes these materials interesting for future spintronic devices that require generation, control and detection of spins as information carriers.

The dissertation begins by reviewing the developing field of TIs which inspired this work, followed by an introduction to the many aspects involved in the growth of atomically precise thin TI films, mainly Bismuth Selenide (Bi2Se3). The details of electrical transport are mentioned next; the experimental techniques thus introduced are used to examine the interplay of bulk and surface contributions to the transport in thin grown Bi2Se3 films. Growth of thin films using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with atomic precision requires precise control of each flux, thus, we first discuss the flux stability in harsh oxidation conditions and derive the optimal configuration that helps grow stoichiometric thin-films. Following this, we discuss the growth of Bi2Se3 films on various substrates and study how this affects the electronic transport. The final work in the dissertation involves the transfer of these grown thin films to other substrates, including plastic, so as to provide a platform for future device applications.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Electric insulators and insulation -- Thin films
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Epitaxy
RelatedItem (type = host)
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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Identifier
ETD_9356
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electronic resource
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (167 pages : illustrations)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Namrata Bansal
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Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-fgke-k520
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
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Name
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Bansal
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Namrata
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Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-11-01 18:08:53
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Name
Namrata Bansal
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Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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Author Agreement License
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
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Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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