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The effects of TeaCrine® and caffeine on endurance and cognitive performance during a simulated match in high-level soccer players

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TitleInfo
Title
The effects of TeaCrine® and caffeine on endurance and cognitive performance during a simulated match in high-level soccer players
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bello
NamePart (type = given)
Marissa
NamePart (type = date)
1993-
DisplayForm
Marissa Bello
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Arent
NamePart (type = given)
Shawn M
DisplayForm
Shawn M Arent
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Alderman
NamePart (type = given)
Brandon L
DisplayForm
Brandon L Alderman
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hoffman
NamePart (type = given)
Daniel J
DisplayForm
Daniel J Hoffman
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Graduate Studies
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2019
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2019-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2019
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Theacrine (1,3,7,9-tetramethyluric-acid) is a pure alkaloid with a similar structure to caffeine and acts comparably as an adenosine receptor antagonist. Early studies have shown non-habituating effects, including increases in energy, focus, and concentration in Teacrine®, the compound containing pure theacrine. PURPOSE: to determine and compare the effects of Teacrine® and caffeine on cognitive performance and time-to-exhaustion during a simulated soccer game in high-level male and female athletes. METHODS: Elite male and female soccer players (N=24; MAge=20.96±2.05y, MMaleVO2max=55.31±3.39mL/O2/kg, MFemaleVO2max=50.97±3.90mL/O2/kg) completed a simulated 90-min soccer match protocol on a treadmill, with cognitive testing including simple reaction time (SRT); choice-RT during a go/no-go task (CRT); and complex-RT during a dual task of go/no go (COGRT) with distraction questions at halftime, and end-of-game. End-of-game testing was followed by a run to exhaustion at 85% VO2max. Participants completed four sessions in randomized order ingesting either 275mg teacrine (TCr), 275mg caffeine (Caf), 125/150mg teacrine+caffeine (TCr+Caf), or placebo(P) 30 min prior to the match. Time of day and pre-exercise nutrition were controlled. RM-MANOVAs with univariate follow-ups were conducted and significance was set at P<0.05. RESULTS: Time-to-exhaustion trended toward improvements in all conditions when compared to placebo (ESTCr=0.43, ESCaf=0.41, ESTCr+Caf=0.51). There was a condition main effect (P<0.05) in which Caf (0.595±0.054s) and TCr+Caf (0.590±0.059s) improved CRT compared to P (0.608±0.067s). There was a significant Time main effect for COGRTWrong, with improved accuracy at post compared to mid (16.46±2.02 vs. 19.20±2.13). A Time main effect also occurred for SRT, with better RT at mid compared to post (0.639±0.054s vs. 0.646±0.054s). However, a Time x Condition interaction (P<0.05) revealed that P improved from mid to post instead (0.646±0.064s vs. 0.632±0.049s). CONCLUSION: The 27-38% improvements in time-to-exhaustion reflect an increased performance capacity with these supplements that may have important implications for “added time” scenarios. The larger improvement in choice-RT from TCr+Caf may be due to overlapping peak times for the supplements, leading athletes to sustain greater focus under fatigue for longer periods compared to the other conditions. Peak times may also play a role as the largest SRT improvements occurred at mid compared to post-game; perhaps a higher dosage would cause less of a decline during the transition between Caf and TCr. The improvement seen in accuracy post-game may indicate a training effect for allocation of resources toward the end of a game when players need greater concentration.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Kinesiology and Applied Physiology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Soccer players
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Caffeine -- Physiological effect
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Theacrine -- Physiological effect
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_9376
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (56 pages : illustrations)
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Marissa Bello
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Graduate Studies Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/t3-7xhk-3r08
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Bello
GivenName
Marissa
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2018-11-28 17:11:06
AssociatedEntity
Name
Marissa Bello
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Graduate Studies
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License
Name
Author Agreement License
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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2019-01-09T14:45:00
DateCreated (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2019-01-09T14:45:00
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